Mille fleur d'uccle genders?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by twinklefairy, Aug 28, 2016.

  1. twinklefairy

    twinklefairy New Egg

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    Jul 24, 2016
    Worksop uk
    Hi all, my 6 chicks are now much bigger since I last posted, am I right in thinking the two with the red bit (sorry not sure what it's called) are roosters? At what age do I need to separate them from the hens if so? And do I need to get rid of them?
    Here's some photos...
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  2. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop

    Yep, you've got two cockerels and four pullets. The "red bit" is typically known as a comb, and it is indeed usually much larger in cockerels.

    Depending on how you want to keep your flock, separation and/or rehoming is one option, but certianly not the only option. Separation may not be a bad idea. Many people keep a "bachelor pen" for their cockerels, usually for when they have too many to comfortably keep them with their hens. Note that good roosters can be an excellent addition to a flock - they watch over the hens, warn them of danger, show them tasty food and treats, and overall provide a strong, guiding presence in the flock. However, if you do wish to keep one or both of them with the hens, you will certainly need more hens. d'Uccles are generally quite friendly with humans, so you're unlikely to have any issues there (if you do, please do get rid of him - there's no sense keeping mean cockerels when there are so many sweet ones out there seeking homes). However, even friendly and docile cockerels may simply mate with pullets too much if they have too few of them, causing pullets to be stressed and exhibit feather loss. I'd recommend having at least 5-8 hens per cockerel to prevent overmating.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2016
  3. twinklefairy

    twinklefairy New Egg

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    Jul 24, 2016
    Worksop uk
    Thankyou, we were given the eggs to hatch in our nursery and so are hoping our headmistress will agree to us keeping them for the children. They've all been handled from hatching with my own 3 year old easily able to scoop them up so I don't think there's an issue as yet with any aggression. But if we're allowed to keep them it's unlikely we'll be able to have a roo as we won't be wanting any more chicks...or is there a way to stop that from happening? Not sure what will happen to the boys if we can't keep them :( they came from a farmer which would be easy to send them back to but I'd be worried about them becoming dinner!
     
  4. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop

    Lol, I have 30 roosters and certainly don't have hundreds of chicks just running around. (Though as a breeder I sometimes wish it was that simple!) No, it takes a lot of work to get eggs to actually hatch. While keeping a rooster does mean the eggs will be fertile and so have the potential to become chicks, in order for them to hatch, you would not only need to have a hen go broody and wish to sit on and hatch them, but then forget to collect eggs for the entire 21 eggs it takes a chick to develop and hatch. Collect eggs regularly and you won't have a problem.

    The unfortunate truth is that few cockerels go to a pet home. The vast majority do end up dinner; that's generally just a rooster's lot in life. Bantams less so, as they have little value as meat fowl, but still many become dog food or the base for chicken broth. I imagine that any breeder or seller who takes back roosters is making dinner of them.
     
  5. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    agree with Queen Misha, unfortunately that is the future of most roosters needing homes.
     
  6. twinklefairy

    twinklefairy New Egg

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    Jul 24, 2016
    Worksop uk
    Ahh nooooo :( I'm vegetarian so hate the idea of this!!! I want to keep them safe, especially since the lighter of the Roos and one of the girls I had to rescue from having been shrink wrapped in their shells :/ they are all so lovely, would be a shame to have to lose any of them but sadly I'm not in charge :(
     

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