Mini donkeys vs. mini horses vs. goats?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by KDOGG331, Oct 31, 2016.

  1. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 Chicken Obsessed

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    Title basically says it, kind of wondering the difference between mini donkeys, mini horses, and goats, and which is the best?

    I know that's probably subjective but I saw this Facebook post yesterday that showed adorable pictures of mini donkeys so of course I started researching them and looking at breed club pages and breeders, etc. For info and cute pictures. I decided I kind of HAVE to have one eventually but then I realized they're kind of expensive.

    So then I thought well maybe I'll look up mini horses and they sort of are too, I'm sure some are cheaper, but kind of the same as for a full size horse, which makes sense but I can't ride a mini one.

    I guess they're probably not really expensive but I wasn't expecting it.

    Anyway, I know goats you can get for like less than $200, sometimes less than $100 even and I've wanted them for a while.

    I guess why I was looking at the donkeys and horses is because supposedly they're really personable and sociable and make great pets? Some even teach them tricks or make them therapy animals? So I definitely eventually want one but goats are definitely cheaper but are they as personable? Can you make them pets or therapy animals or teach them tricks, walk them, anything like that? Maybe only certain breeds? What about sheep?

    Another thing I thought about is like a pot belly pig or just any pig or something? But my parents and most people probably wouldn't find that cute if I walk around with it, not that it matters, but I hear they're really smart and clean? And can learn tricks like a dog?

    Eventually I'll probably own all of them and full size horses, more chickens and dogs, a regular farm HAH, but atm I'm not sure my family would appreciate spending the money for the donkeys or horses but let's just pretend they will.

    Which is your favorite and why? Do they all cost about the same to keep? And can goats, sheep, or pigs, be pets too?

    Thanks, sorry its so long
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2016
  2. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Overrun With Chickens

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    My option would be a goat. They are priced much less than the other 2. Many peeps keep them as pets. Search out goat threads and read up. Full grown they are not very big. They would most likely be able to survive on the land you currently reside.(meaning grazing on grass).
    Here is a funny true story. I go to a swap meet where there are all type of animals from chickens to goats to ducks, pigeons, as well as accessories and sometimes flowers and vegetable plants. My daughter has accompanied me there at times. She is probably like you. She just loved those goats. I casually asked this one farmer how much for his small goat. I told him I was just curious, and not able to keep one. He told me $40. My daughter petted and played with goat, and then we move on. As we were leaving, farmer said "you can have her for $35" I kindly thanked him and reassured him we were not able to have one in town. Then I told my daughter that next month we would return early. I would buy her a goat. She could play and walk the goat there all around. At noon things start to wrap up. I would go back to farmer and just return the goat. Obviously I would not ask for a refund. And thank him for making my daughter day. Farmer sells goat/ farmer brings gift goat back home.[​IMG]
    My second story I tell my friends about goats is my plan for ORGANIC LAWN SERVICE I want to start up. It is obviously a joking conversation. I would rent out my goat to neighbors on a daily basis free of charge, or small fee given voluntarily. Goat eats grass. No air pollution, plus automatic fertilizer service. All organic and natural. Next day, next neighbor.
    If I lived out in the country on a small spread, I sure would have a goat or 2. More than the small number of pet chickens that I have now. I also would have a pond and keep a few ducks. Am bound by the city life and doing the best I can.
    Here are some pix from that swap meet. Would you be able to resist not bringing any of these home.. [​IMG]
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  3. res

    res Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mini horses and donkeys are going to require a farrier visit every 6-8 weeks to trim their feet. Depends on where you live, but it is generally $30-40 per animal per visit. It adds up. You can learn how to trim them yourself, but it isn't easy, and requires expensive tools.

    Goats need their feet trimmed, also, but it is something you can do yourself, with cheap tools.

    Based on their feet alone, goats are the easiest choice...

    As far as feed and personality, they are all about equal.

    Horses and mini donks are easier to fence in, though goats can be equally easy to fence if you use electrified netting.

    Goats produce less poop than horses....

    Go with goats...
     
  4. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 Chicken Obsessed

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    Thank you both for all the great info and help! And of course the laughs with the great stories :D

    And rich, actually that lawn service thing isn't a bad idea! There's actually people around here and I think spreading through the country that do that. Except they don't just eat the grass but rather hire them out for weed eating and brush clearing. There's a few companies as well as individuals now. You basically tell them what you want cleared, how big it is, etc. And some come out and make sure the plants are safe for the goats, some don't, then depending on the size and density of the area you want cleared, they deliver a certain number of goats, anywhere from just a couple to more, and you can keep them for 24 hours, a week, whatever, depending on how much you need cleared and how long it will take, they set up usually electronetting around the area and they just clear it for you, no chemicals or anything. A lot of national parks, golf courses, etc. Are starting to use it now because it's more environmentally friendly. You could probably make a lot of money LOL I know you were joking but it actually is a real business these days.

    And yeah, one thing I read said like $10 to $20 for the farrier because of their small size but I thought that sounded pretty dang cheap; $30-$40 sounds much more realistic. Even though they're small they still require specialty services. I can see how that would add up fast.

    I actually watched a YouTube video a year or two ago, read all up on goats and hoof trimming, etc. And from what I watched and read, it seemed pretty easy to trim them. Heck, I even went crazy and ordered a few goat supplies at that time, including hoof trimmers [​IMG] I just need to find them. And I guess get goats, I forgot I got that but figured if I didn't get them then I would EVENTUALLY. Lol

    Do goats need grain or is that optional? I've seen a lot of differing opinions on that.

    I assume they definitely need hay or just in winter? They need browse, right? Not just grass? We have plenty of both but just wondering and making sure.

    That's good they have good personalities too :)

    By easier to fence do you mean the goats would jump a fence or?

    Oh and idk if I asked this already or not but can goats be walked or no?

    Goats definitely seem like a good option :)
     
  5. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Overrun With Chickens

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    I know that feed store sells special pellets feed for goats and sheep. During winter you would have to supplement that feed since grass not available, Hay of course would be a staple most time. Straw would be for bedding. I never had a goat but my grandmother did. (that was a verrrrrrrrrry long time ago) Goat grazed in the pasture all summer. I was too small to know what she fed during winter. I assume they can be walked. When I was a child, seen peeps walk their goats and cows to a central large pasture , past our home from their homes. If you do get a female goat, and milk production is a thing you would want, I think you would have to optimize feed to get optimized milk results. It is same with chickens. Correct feed = good laying of eggs.
     
  6. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 Chicken Obsessed

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    Whoops, sorry, i forgot i never replied to this hah thanks for all your help :)
     

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