Misshapen and sandpaper eggs

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by gwenakinyi, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. gwenakinyi

    gwenakinyi Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 24, 2010
    Bellingham, WA
    I've got a dark Brahma, 1 1/2 years old, started laying fall 2010. In spring 2011 (maybe starting in May?) she started laying jumbo, misshapen, rough eggs, with brittle shells. When cracked open, the egg white is thin and runny, and the membrane around the yolk is also very thin.

    She only lays appx. 2 eggs a week, while our other Brahma lays 4-5 a week. When she first started laying last fall her eggs were normal, but we haven't seen a normal one from her since this trend started this spring. She looks otherwise healthy and doesn't seem bothered. I've read a ton of posts about eggs of this description, and they all seem to suggest this happens to a couple of eggs early or late in the hen's career (which isn't the case for her) or mites. No evidence of mites.

    Does anyone have any ideas?
     
  2. Yay Chicks!

    Yay Chicks! Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 15, 2010
    Forest Grove, OR
    I sure can't give you a firm answer, but I do believe that sometimes it's just genetics. There's also a link on here, somewhere, to a page that gives reasons for abnormal eggs...not sure where it is, but perhaps a search on "abnormal eggs" might turn it up?
     
  3. gwenakinyi

    gwenakinyi Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 24, 2010
    Bellingham, WA
    Thanks, I actually found that same link. It suggested that there could be a genetic be a problem with the eggshell gland, but that seemed like such an odd answer...especially since she layed just fine last year. Thanks for responding.
     
  4. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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  5. gwenakinyi

    gwenakinyi Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 24, 2010
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    Well shoot. I researched peritonitis and checked my chicken when I got home. Sure enough, her abdomen and vent region are soft and gummy. Oh dear. Do I need to put her down? Gritsar, did you find any cure for it?
     
  6. gwenakinyi

    gwenakinyi Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 24, 2010
    Bellingham, WA
    I'm pretty stumped. Upon further research, it seems that if it was egg peritonitis, she'd be dead by now. It's been at least 6 months since the irregular laying started, and she doesn't display any obvious discomfort. No panting, dragging her tail, odd posture, nothing. She eats and drinks. But the abdomen below her vent is definitely squishy, red, and hot. Still laying the 2 eggs per week regularly though. I don't know what to do. Do I just stop eating the eggs and wait to see what happens? Take her to a vet? Cull her? This is my first chicken sickness.
     
  7. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:I'm sorry. [​IMG]

    I gave my hen shots of penicillin whenever she seemed ill with the peritonitis and it did seem to help her, unfortunately there isn't a cure. It will eventually end her life. My hen did okay for awhile - maybe 8 months or so, but then it got very hot here. The combination of the hot weather and the peritonitis was too much for her and she passed. [​IMG]
     
  8. shelby528

    shelby528 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Question does it take a long time for her to lay these eggs? I had a similar occurance with peritonitis and as there is no cure I kept my baby away from the rest made her own little "penthouse" if you will and gave her cottage cheese which seemed to help a little with the egg problem. I soaked her every morning and night in luke warm water and then cleaned around her vent area with some polysporin and peroxide<CAREFULLY>. It seemed to help with any swelling or discomfort.
     
  9. gwenakinyi

    gwenakinyi Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 24, 2010
    Bellingham, WA
    Shelby, did your hen eventually die from it? I'm not home during the day when she lays, so I don't really know how hard it is for her to get those jumbo eggs out. Can't be easy though. Here's where I'm stuck: when we got chickens, we made the decision that these would be well cared for livestock, not pets, so I'm resistant to spending money at the vet for her, ESPECIALLY if the answer is that she's going to die and we shouldn't be eating the eggs. If it IS peritonitis, and there's no cure, then we should cull her. But if it's not, then I'd hate to kill her! I guess these are the decisions we have to make, hm?
     

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