Mission: Carrier cockerel moving to other flock with 14 hens.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by GhettoRoo, Mar 12, 2015.

  1. GhettoRoo

    GhettoRoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello. So, main qustion is, How? And how better.
    For example.. Keep that cockerel seperate from flock there for few days. Or keep it seperate from that flock wher im going to put him.
    Its 15 miles away. So how to take away. In dark, not in dark. Take him there, and put in night, as he wakes up, he just wakes up in new place. :D
    Opinions? Vacinate him before?
    Im gonna give him and hens a pig probiotic food for first 2 weeks.
     
  2. GhettoRoo

    GhettoRoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So. Did i hit the wrong forum for asking?
     
  3. justplainbatty

    justplainbatty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No, not the wrong forum. I, at least, don't understand your question. Do you want to move a cockerel by putting it in an "animal carrier" or do you want to put a bird who is a "carrier" of a disease into a different flock?
     
  4. GhettoRoo

    GhettoRoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is my thing. Yes. + he had never shown any simptoms. Hes my home hatched, self breed chicken.
    But live next to chickens which had shown simptoms, so he probably is a carrier.
    I guess they go thru disieases when they are young, like humans do with chicken pox. Cuz my home hatched birds are way healthier, than those, which I bought, and get these diseases in.
    So. Im gonna do that.
    +, Im interested how to move hime with less stress.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2015
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    If you suspect your rooster is a disease carrier, have him tested to verify he's a carrier. Then if the tests are negative, no problem. If they are positive, cull him.
    If you suspect your rooster is a carrier and dont want to have him tested, cull him.
     
  6. GhettoRoo

    GhettoRoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Culling is not a option there. I had raised him for 7 months, day in day, u know, u got to feed birds everyday, so, Im gonna keep him or gave to, in this case, my grandmother.
    Im workin on cullin everyone who show simtoms daily or cant get away from them.
    So the question is just how u do it. Im waiting for warmer weather now.
     
  7. justplainbatty

    justplainbatty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You should probably just keep him then. If you expose him to other birds, either he will transmit and sicken the new flock or, they may be carriers of something that will make him sick. If any bird in either flock has ever had say, a "cold" which is actually a respiratory illness, then that bird is a carrier. Other birds in the same flock may be asymptomatic but still carriers. In times of stress or change, the respiratory illness can flare up again. If other birds are sick, keep a closed flock, or all in all out policy and treat or cull.
     
  8. GhettoRoo

    GhettoRoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    These hens, where im thinking to put my cockerel is a young hens, under one year of age. Big, healthy hens. They get these hens from same place where I had got half of mine hens, last pick turned sick, cuz in first night 2 months old chickens got attacked by predator, that caused stress, and the illness start to come out.
    So, these hens are healthy. Each flock had ''own'' virues, so i hope my cockerel would get well with it, + dont carrier his flock virus there. So, thats why im looking to give all hens and cockerel a little pig probiotic food, to strengthen imunity. I start to give hime garlic week before day in day before going to move him. But I think to move him 2-3 week from today, so, mby im gonna change my mind, I just have 3 brothers of them, and want to keep one, they are pretty alpha male blooded, but grown from birth together, but dont like each other when see mating hens, + I have two more roosters, which are alpha and beta. So, killing is not a option at all, so, move or live somehow.
     
  9. justplainbatty

    justplainbatty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I strongly recommend that you do not move this roo to another flock! The viruses that the "healthy young hens" had and the illness in the "old" chickens have may be different or different strains of same illness. It is nearly impossible to know. Moving the rooster may stress him, inducing his virus and giving it to new hens. Additionally, the stress to the new hens receiving a strange rooster could cause their illness to show again. It is not ethical to spread and exchange diseases between flocks. If you have too many roosters and they are harassing the hens, build a bachelor pen for the roos who get along. Only allow them short periods of time to mate hens, although breeding birds with illness is not a good idea either, some diseases are transmitted to the embryo. Maybe just split your hens and roos into two flocks on your property. It is incumbent upon you, not to spread avian diseases to other flocks and communities. Please treat and keep your birds according to biosecurity protocols or cull. [​IMG]
     
  10. GhettoRoo

    GhettoRoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    But Im from Europe, changing sick birds there is like 'hobby'' 'daily buisness'. There mycomplasma, marek and etc virusis is all over europe.
    Dont vaccination give something there?
     

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