Misters

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Violet22, Jun 23, 2010.

  1. Violet22

    Violet22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 3, 2009
    Central Coast, CA
    I am going to put a misting system in for my ducks because we have many days of 100-105 degrees, and usually a few days well above that. Right now, it's been "cold", only 90 or so. I am expecting two more hatches and was wondering if the mist would be too cold or wet on the newborns? The mist won't hit the nests as they are in doghouses, only if the ducklings come out, which they will of course, but they won't be getting wet while hatching. I don't want to separate them after they have hatched, and there will be areas the misters won't reach. Any thoughts, or am I just being a worry wart?
     
  2. katharinad

    katharinad Overrun with chickens

    One thing to consider is that the mister will reduce the temp by 20 degrees. So on a 90 degree day the temps will be down to 70, which can be to cold for the babies in their first 2 weeks. Can you turn off the nozzles in that one area alone? Perhaps you can cover the few spray heads with some a piece of cotton cloth and secure it with an elastic band so it will only drip in that area rather then misting until they are old enough.
     
  3. Violet22

    Violet22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 3, 2009
    Central Coast, CA
    I had no idea it would be 20 degrees cooler, I know they cooled, but not that well! I do have plugs I can use in some areas until they get bigger, so I will do that now that I know how much cooler it will make it. Thank you!
    They should be hatching any day now, I hope so, I am getting anxious!
     
  4. katharinad

    katharinad Overrun with chickens

    Those misters are wonderful in the dry climate. I see you live in the central coast area of California. If you live in the Salinas Valley or Gilroy area you really need them. I used to live in Seaside, but all we had was fog and cold temps from the Ocean. Plus the salt water corroded everything. Drive 5 minutes inland and you cook you feet or bun off. [​IMG]
     
  5. Violet22

    Violet22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 3, 2009
    Central Coast, CA
    I live near Paso Robles, and it's dry and hot, I have the opposite of what you did in Seaside, I drive 15 minutes to the coast and freeze my buns off when it's 105 here! [​IMG] Too bad I couldn't pack up the ducks for a day at the beach!
     
  6. katharinad

    katharinad Overrun with chickens

    I've been to Paso Robles several times. It's a very nice town. Have a friend who lives up there, and we also loved to go to Hunter Ligget hiking. It does get pretty hot out there. We have moved up to Oregon since. We are in the mountains, near Klamath Falls, which makes it really dry out here. In summer we can also get 100's, but at least the nights go down to 60-70 and we sleep with open windows. I'm considering installing one myself just for the hot days to help the duckies.
     
  7. Violet22

    Violet22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 3, 2009
    Central Coast, CA
    The nights here are why I live here! To sleep well, I do need the AC, it doesn't cool down that much. I should say the older I get, the more I need it, when I moved here 10 years ago I did ok with just the windows open. Every summer I wonder how any of the animals survive outside. I had my ducks inside until late summer, so they got some heat when I put them out, not too awful, but I still felt sorry for them. They have lots of water in a couple pools, buckets and low bowls, but I would go out and spray down the enclosure during the day, and also hose my horse down. This year it will be nice to have automatic misters for the ducks, and I may have enough to give the horse and sheep at least one small area with them.
    I've never been to Oregon, just seen beautiful pictures from there.
     

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