1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Mites...can they materialize out of nowhere??

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by purplesquirrel, Jan 31, 2014.

  1. purplesquirrel

    purplesquirrel Chillin' With My Peeps

    433
    16
    93
    Dec 7, 2013
    Bristol, United Kingdom
    I'm about to go and buy 2 nine month old hens from some one, and I already have 4 chickens that I incubated and hand raised.
    I asked the lady if they had been medicated for disease and pests, such as mites and she said yes.
    I explained that I hand reared mine and I was slightly concerned that they would develop something from me bringing in 'outsiders'.

    She said all her chickens get treated for mites and diseases annually, and that even I could have mites from MY chickens, even though their coop is new and the garden has never had chickens before and they have never been in contact with other poultry.

    Are mites in the ground and grasses like ticks or hookworm etc?

    I don't want to give my chickens any medicines (unless desperately necessarily), I want to keep their health as natural and medicine-free as possible.
    They are 18 weeks old and I feed them organic layers pellets and never use any chemicals in my garden and they are looking beautiful!

    If anyone can shed some light on my mite concern that would be brilliant, many thanks.
     
  2. granny hatchet

    granny hatchet Tastes like chicken Premium Member

    65,852
    11,250
    726
    Sep 26, 2013
    madison Indiana
    never add new birds to your flock without a month of quarantine. i have made this deadly mistake before and trust its not worth it. no matter what people tell you about how healthy their birds are. they could also be carriers of something the owners never knew about. so watch for yourself. other animals bring mites . wild birds are the worst. in going natural, i have heard DE is supposed to help with mites. i have never used it.
     
  3. purplesquirrel

    purplesquirrel Chillin' With My Peeps

    433
    16
    93
    Dec 7, 2013
    Bristol, United Kingdom

    oh God! Ok, well I'll put the newbies in the smaller coop and they can stay in the run whilst I let the others out into the garden...
    Do most diseases or illnesses have side effects I can look out for when I go to choose them/when I get them back to my home?

    My chickens furiously chase any blackbirds that land on the lawn, they don't have any contact with them though.
    I'll have to get some supplies just in case.
    Thanks so much for your response, this forum is brilliant for troubleshooting!

    x
     
  4. granny hatchet

    granny hatchet Tastes like chicken Premium Member

    65,852
    11,250
    726
    Sep 26, 2013
    madison Indiana
    just normal cold symptoms, shaking the head, sneezing ,ect... stay away from the loners,look for bright clear eyes, healthy feathers . some chickens can look great and be a carrier.so the month to themselves will tell usually tell you. mostly they will be fine but err on the side of caution.
     
  5. purplesquirrel

    purplesquirrel Chillin' With My Peeps

    433
    16
    93
    Dec 7, 2013
    Bristol, United Kingdom
    stay away from the loners, lol.
    Many thanks :)
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    28,961
    2,942
    471
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Mites can be brought in on bales of hay or straw. Always shake the bale over some white paper to look for mites when you buy it. I don't use either, but prefer pine shavings--the larger variety. Always quarantine a new chicken in a separate coop for at least 30 days, and wash your hands and change shoes between coops. Look for any respiratory symptoms such as watery eyes and sneezing, snots, or rattles in the chest. Watch for symptoms of coccidiosis after the new birds are on the ground--each yard may have a different strain.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by