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mites in silkies and wood shaving question

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Smoky73, May 14, 2007.

  1. Smoky73

    Smoky73 Lyon Master

    Feb 8, 2007
    Colorado
    Here I am, a week from the show and bathing birds. I have checked my birds for mites and lice and have been pretty sure that my birds were fine. How could I be so stupid? Apparently the feathering on my silkies are so heavy, I had no idea that they had them but once started bathing, I have learned otherwise.
    I am not sure how to keep this probelm under check if I cant even tell they had them to begin with but I need to do something.

    A friend told me a really good cochin breeder cuts up those blue die-no-mite strips and fastens them to the birds leg with a zip tie. I am anxious to see how well it works AND WONDER HOW LONG THEY ARE SUPPOSED TO LAST?(in a coop, 2 years)
    Has anyone ever heard of this?
    . I cut each strip into thirds and then in half. But anyway, I washed the birds in Adams flea and tick shampoo today, and I know I didnt kill them all but got the majority. I will probably treat with eprinex in a week or so but wondered about wood shavings. These shavings are really clean, I just changed them out two weeks ago.
    I know cedar is supposed to be toxic to use nothing but, but would it be okay and helpful do you think to mix maybe a 1/3 cedar in with 2/3 pine or would that be too much?
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2007
  2. eggchel

    eggchel Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I have been battling "silkie mites" for the last couple months, too. With their black skin and thick downy feathers (and my old eyes, LOL), it can be hard to see the little bitty buggers, especially on the back of the neck. I have one pair of silkies that have them especially bad.:mad:



    chel
     
  3. Smoky73

    Smoky73 Lyon Master

    Feb 8, 2007
    Colorado
    I know one breeder who uses nothing but cedar and she has never lost birds due to it and I know that cedar is supposed to repell mites and lice.
    I have all the DE around the pens, but want something else as it obviously hasnt been enough, they just don't dust!
    I will certainly have to be more thorough about checking them for mites and bathing not just before show. I don't have this problem with my Dutch bantams, I can see when they have them clearly and treat with adams as needed.
     
  4. beameuplord

    beameuplord Out Of The Brooder

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    May 8, 2007
    My dad and I both use cedar shavings with no problems.

    TJ
     
  5. Oaknim

    Oaknim Out Of The Brooder

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    Sylvia, KS
    I've never bathed a chicken, but for my dogs and cats I use a combination of NEEM oil, castile soap, and water, with a vinegar rinse. I also spray the horses and goats with a lemongrass/neem/water mixture and it keeps the bugs away. I also use tea tree oil to repel bugs. Pyrethin (sp?) is good for keeping away insects and of course, DE - but Chel said it was useless against those little monsters...so I'm out of ideas. [​IMG] I hope you find something that works! ~ Oaknim
     
  6. Smoky73

    Smoky73 Lyon Master

    Feb 8, 2007
    Colorado
    beameuplord,

    Do you guys use straight cedar? See, I have another aquantaince that uses cedar without a problem. I wonder at what point it becomes a problem to some?
     
  7. beameuplord

    beameuplord Out Of The Brooder

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    I have used straight cedar and some mixed with pine as well. But they aren't only exposed to it continually. The hay from my bunnies gets mixed in as well so it isn't like they wade around in cedar shavings all the time. what kind of problems can it supposedly cause? It is possible mine haven't been exposed to it too much to make a health problem.

    TJ
     
  8. Smoky73

    Smoky73 Lyon Master

    Feb 8, 2007
    Colorado
    Well, my birds get outside access (most of them) but I have pretty good ventilation in the coop, large windows.
    It seems that people complain about the toxic effects of breathing it in?
     
  9. kstaven

    kstaven Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Cedars biggest problem is ingesting it. The oil in cedar is highly toxic. It is a bigger problem with chicks than adults as chicks try to eat everything in sight.

    Kiln dried shavings reduce the oil and the associated potential respiratory issues. Climate makes a difference also. Excess moisture combined with heat releases the oil and it gets in the chickens feathers. When preening they ingest the oil.
     
  10. barg

    barg Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 27, 2007
    I was thinking of making part of my coop with cedar... up in the roof area, but i read it was harmfull so i didnt. Im not finished with my coop and still could use it. Would this be likely to repel anything in a small amount, could it be harmful to my young chicks, should i be making a new topic for this... so many questions [​IMG]
     

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