Mites on 1 wk old chicks

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by MomMommyMamma, Jun 25, 2010.

  1. MomMommyMamma

    MomMommyMamma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2010
    West Virginia
    We have a 3 mo. old hen, seven 3 wk old chicks, and four 1 wk old chicks. When we hold the 1 wk old chicks I am seeing tiny little bugs on them - mites? Do I need to do anything about this? We keep the older chicks out in the run with the older hen during the day and bring them in at night. I have not seen mites on them, but I also have not seen the hen or any of the chicks taking dust baths. I put a large feed pan of sandy dirt in the coop today (it's been very rainy and there's not a lot of "dust" dirt in the run right now). We saw the hen in the dust a little but not the chicks.
    Are these mites something that I need to worry about since we have the chicks in our house in a brooder (a large box w/ shavings, water, food). I don't want any of the 7 of us humans to get mites - can that happen?? [​IMG]
     
  2. theFox

    theFox Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2009
    Standish, Maine
    The mites don't like humans, I'd worry about the birds though, enough of those bugs can kill chickens.

    You need some poultry dust and follow the instructions as you'll have to do several treatments before they are gone..

    Be certain to wear a mask as none of that stuff is good for you.

    You also need to make certain that the birds have a dust bath. That is what they normally use to control bugs with.

    You can add poultry dust and food grade DE to the sand in the dust bath.

    DE and dust baths by themselves are good preventative measures but will fall short if you have a real infestation.

    The choice is yours.
     
  3. MomMommyMamma

    MomMommyMamma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2010
    West Virginia
    Quote:Poultry dust and the food grade DE - I should be able to ge these at the feed store?
     
  4. theFox

    theFox Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2009
    Standish, Maine
    Normally you can find them at feed stores. At least I had no trouble in this area.
     
  5. MomMommyMamma

    MomMommyMamma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2010
    West Virginia
    OK. The poultry dust will have instructions, but what about the DE. How do I apply that to the chicks? Seems like someone told me that if it gets into their lungs it can be very bad?
     
  6. stampntam

    stampntam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 13, 2010
    Spring Grove, PA
    Be sure to dust all chickens and their surrounding areas, you will need to do it again in 7 to 10 days. The dust will not kill the eggs and that is about the time they will hatch.
     
  7. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2009
    DFW
    Where are these chicks sleeping at night? You need to dump out that bedding, too, clean out the container really well, put some poultry dust down in the bottom of that and then add fresh bedding.
     
  8. theFox

    theFox Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2009
    Standish, Maine
    Quote:The DE should be added to their dust bath dirt and the litter. Some people dust their chickens with it as well.

    Please understand that food grade DE is also very fine and like the poultry dust should only be applied while wearing a mask. In fact anything that contains very fine particles should only be handled while wearing a mask.

    There are several ways to dust the birds. Depending on the size of the birds and how happy they are at being held you can apply the powder by placing the dusting material in a plastic bag and inserting the bird hind end first until all but the head and neck are in the bag and then shaking the bag (not the bird). It is usually a two person job done this way. You can also purchase a device that will emit a good sized cloud of dust which you can then use with the birds siting on their roosts.

    I dust after dark as the birds are not prone to even notice if I don't do something stupid like bump into something and yelp. This is just like putting flea powder on a dog or cat.

    The goal is to get the dust over most of the birds body but not in its eyes or nostrils with particular attention paid to is hind end and under the wings.

    Also I might as well let you know that a number of people resort to off label use of a cattle De Wormer as it also is effective on lice and mites (and other things). This particular material requires that you do not eat the eggs for a period of time and since I've never seen a poultry specific egg withdrawal time isn't one that I use.

    I use poultry dust for prevention and as a previous poster mentioned the bedding needs to be taken care of as well if you do the dusting inside the coop with a duster you will also be getting bedding material.

    The protocol for use of dusts and other control measures involving insecticides (ether natural or otherwise) generally calls for a variation in what gets used for the next infestation. Always read the labels, use only as directed, always wear protection.
     
  9. MomMommyMamma

    MomMommyMamma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2010
    West Virginia
    Quote:The hen (3 mo. old) is outside in the coop, the 3+ wk old chicks are outside in the run/coop during the day and in a large cardboard box w/ pine shavings at night. The 1 wk old chicks are in a large plastic bin w/ pine shavings all day & night - outside during the day when it gets warm enough and inside w/ a light the rest of the time.
     
  10. MomMommyMamma

    MomMommyMamma Chillin' With My Peeps

    569
    0
    131
    Jun 13, 2010
    West Virginia
    Quote:The DE should be added to their dust bath dirt and the litter. Some people dust their chickens with it as well.

    Please understand that food grade DE is also very fine and like the poultry dust should only be applied while wearing a mask. In fact anything that contains very fine particles should only be handled while wearing a mask.

    There are several ways to dust the birds. Depending on the size of the birds and how happy they are at being held you can apply the powder by placing the dusting material in a plastic bag and inserting the bird hind end first until all but the head and neck are in the bag and then shaking the bag (not the bird). It is usually a two person job done this way. You can also purchase a device that will emit a good sized cloud of dust which you can then use with the birds siting on their roosts.

    I dust after dark as the birds are not prone to even notice if I don't do something stupid like bump into something and yelp. This is just like putting flea powder on a dog or cat.

    The goal is to get the dust over most of the birds body but not in its eyes or nostrils with particular attention paid to is hind end and under the wings.

    Also I might as well let you know that a number of people resort to off label use of a cattle De Wormer as it also is effective on lice and mites (and other things). This particular material requires that you do not eat the eggs for a period of time and since I've never seen a poultry specific egg withdrawal time isn't one that I use.

    I use poultry dust for prevention and as a previous poster mentioned the bedding needs to be taken care of as well if you do the dusting inside the coop with a duster you will also be getting bedding material.

    The protocol for use of dusts and other control measures involving insecticides (ether natural or otherwise) generally calls for a variation in what gets used for the next infestation. Always read the labels, use only as directed, always wear protection.

    Called the 3 local feed stores - including a Tractor Supply - none of them have the food grade DE. I take it the DE we have to use in our garden will not suffice? I'm going to go read the label but won't apply unless it uses the term "food grade". So, poultry dust alone - is that going to work?
     

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