Mixed Breed Ideas

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Allisha, Jan 27, 2016.

  1. Allisha

    Allisha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So, I don't normally enjoy breeding different breeds together, because it distracts people's attention from breeding true breeds, but the past few weeks I have been awfully curious on how a few different breeds would look like if they were bred together.

    I have Golden Cuckoo Marans, Speckled Sussexes, Light Brahmas, Silver Laced Wyandottes, Salmon Faverolle's, Apenzellar Spitzhaubens, and one White Leghorn pullet. I have hens and roosters from all breeds, so I feel like my combinations are endless. I was pondering if I should just breed one particular combination for fun, if they were really pretty.

    So, any ideas on what any of these breeds would look like together?
    If I breed any of the breeds together, I want them to look pretty nice, you know?
    I know these threads are pretty common, but I searched everywhere, and the combinations seem that they do not have any examples I could follow by.
     
  2. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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  3. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    The Marans hens bred to any of the other roosters should produce sexlinks, only the cockerels will be barred. The Light Brahma hens, Silver Laced Wyandotte hens, Salmon Faverolles hens, and the Spitzhauben (if they are silver) crossed with the Speckled Sussex rooster should produce red sexlinks; all the female chicks will be gold/red like their father. Speckling is a recessive gene, so don't expect to get any of your crosses to show speckling. White Leghorns are dominant white, so all her chicks will likely be solid white. Dominant traits that will show in at least 50% of the chicks are crests (Spitzhauben), feathered legs (Marans, Faverolles, Brahma), rose combs (Wyandotte), pea combs (Brahma), fifth toes (Faverolle), and white skin (Marans, Sussex, Spitzhauben, and Faverolles). If you cross a rose comb breed with a pea comb breed you will get some walnut combs.
     
  4. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Junebuggena, is that how silkies ended up with such horrible combs? I think it totally ruins the look of an otherwise lovely breed.
     
  5. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    I agree walnut combs are ugly. But for me, Polish combs creep me out. Little blobs with antennae coming out of them...[​IMG]
     
  6. Allisha

    Allisha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the information, guys! I knew the Speckled is recessive, but otherwise, I had not thought of all the other things. And I shall check out the calculator, too.
     
  7. Allisha

    Allisha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Would the Golden coloration from the Marans play with any of the factors?
     
  8. mix3dbreed

    mix3dbreed Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You were correct. That site is addictive.
     
  9. Allisha

    Allisha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It took me a few minutes to understand how it works, but it offers a few good examples on how your chickens could look like, with various crossings.
     
  10. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    I honestly don't have a clue what genes a Golden Cuckoo has. A lot of Cuckoo Marans are genetically 'birchen' instead of extended black like most cuckoo/barred breeds, but I have no idea if that is also true for golden cuckoos.
    I'm pretty sure that the golden color original came from Black Copper breedings to Cuckoo Marans. But there are other genes at play in them to cause the light golden color instead of the dark 'copper' color.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2016

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