Mixed Flock Questions

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by weekendskp, Apr 5, 2011.

  1. weekendskp

    weekendskp Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 5, 2011
    I have three Buff Orpingtons, two Rhode Island Reds, and what I think is an Appenzeller Spitzhauben. How will I know which hens are producing? I'm not sitting there watching them lay eggs.
     
  2. AmyRey

    AmyRey Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 25, 2009
    Believe it or not, you can tell who is laying and who is not by feeling the bones just underneath their vent. Once you find the layer, you'll notice a considerably larger gap between the two bones than in those who aren't.

    Lemme do a search for a picture perhaps.
     
  3. ChickenGirl3

    ChickenGirl3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 27, 2010
    the Buff will have light brown, RIR will have a darker brown egg than the Buff and the Appenzeller Spitzhauben lays white eggs [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] !
     
  4. AmyRey

    AmyRey Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 25, 2009
  5. weekendskp

    weekendskp Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 5, 2011
    They have only been in the coop one day. I don't want to man handle the ladies to examine their private areas just yet. I still don't understand, even among the three birds that are alike, how one knows which bird laid the egg. If there's one egg and it's light brown (from a buff orp) and there's three hens, do I examine directly after finding an egg?
     
  6. secuono

    secuono Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 29, 2010
    Virginia
    New to the coop, they may not lay for a few weeks until they feel at home again. Some may lay right away like nothing happened.
     
  7. weekendskp

    weekendskp Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 5, 2011
    I took a picture of my odd hen. I think it looks more like a Houdan. What do you think?
    [​IMG]
     
  8. AmyRey

    AmyRey Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 25, 2009
    Quote:No, once an egg passes through that area and widens the bones, it stays that way (as far as I know) forever. So, the one with the large gap will be your layer.
     

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