Mixing feeds

Discussion in 'Nutrition - Sponsored by Purina Poultry' started by Rosey516, Oct 9, 2016.

  1. Rosey516

    Rosey516 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    First let me say thank God for all of you!! I am a first timer and don't know what I would have done without your knowledge... ok so I have a small mixed flock some are laying some aren't yet, they roam the yard for about 3 hours a day feasting on everything lol can I mix the starter feed with the layer I just hate to waste it.. I give them purina organic and I have almost a whole bag of starter left..
     
  2. GC-Raptor

    GC-Raptor Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sure if they're 16 weeks or older, mix the starter and layers 50/50, with oyster shell on the side. If the starter is medicated with Amproliom, it's safe to eat the eggs. That's how I switched my girls over to layers. I did that for 2 weeks. Then I mixed the rest of the starter 50/50 with scratch grains till gone, as a treat. And you can toss starter feed on dry ground as a treat by itself. GC
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2016
  3. Rosey516

    Rosey516 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi go- raptor I do t feed medicated.. do I have to be careful eating eggs?
     
  4. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    I see GC-Raptor is offline. Perfectly fine to eat the eggs, just remember to remove the shell [​IMG]
     
  5. GC-Raptor

    GC-Raptor Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You don't feed medicated, it's safe to eat the eggs.
    If you feed medicated and the medication is Amprolium, it's safe to eat the eggs. GC
     
  6. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    Hi. [​IMG]

    I personally wouldn't switch to layer until all are laying. Too much calcium is not good long term, it can cause kidney issues. It is OK for them all to eat the starter until it's gone as long as you provide oyster shell on the side, which is recommended even with layer feed. Only the layers will access what they need. Also, starter feed is usually higher in protein. I think higher protein is better for growing birds and the usual 16% in layer is the BARE MINIMUM.

    I feed Purina flock raiser with 20% protein. I have a mixed age and gender flock. It is not organic. And I have a hard time finding all flock in organic, so I would stick with an unmedicated starter forever if it was important to me. Higher protein and lower calcium won't hurt layers (OS on the side), but the opposite is true... lower protein and higher calcium can be detrimental to non layers. Also, higher protein helps birds when molting to regrow feathers faster and they don't need the added calcium either. Many of mine aren't laying at 24+ weeks, different breeds and no artificial light way up north here. Sorry if I talked in circles and made it confusing. [​IMG]

    Congrats on your first flock! [​IMG]
     
  7. DrPatrickBiggs

    DrPatrickBiggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi Rosey516,

    Great question! If the medication is just amprolium, then the eggs are safe to eat. If the medication is not amprolium, then I would need to know the medication(s) in the feed.

    In response to your first question, I recommend switching to a complete layer feed at 18-20 weeks of age. To help ease the transition, consider mixing your current feed with the new layer feed. In general, as you transition from one diet to another, it is important to have a transition period (7-10 days) where you mix the feeds together. This will help avoid digestive upsets and allow your birds to get used to the taste and texture of their new feed. So, it's actually helpful that you have some of the starter feed left!
     
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  8. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    I can't help but wonder what you are a Dr. of? Couldn't find anything in your profile. Just curious. [​IMG] As I find it unfortunate many will believe anyone with Dr. in front of their name.

    What if the birds don't start laying for the whole rest of the winter (don't know location)? I do think that combining feeds is a good ideal for transition, but I would be more concerned about kidney function than a hint of temporary indigestion. [​IMG] And many are still growing at that age, decreased protein and increased calcium won't help them. Oyster shell on the side is good for those already laying, but mixed in (as in layer feed) is bad for those who aren't as they have no option to avoid it.

    @Rosey516 It's a personal choice. And your birds may not be around long enough for you to see the problems arise. But it does happen, especially in pet homes where the hens are still living past laying age. Let me say 1 more time.... I have pullets 28+ weeks who aren't laying, so if you just go as recommended according to age it won't account for individuals or circumstances and may not be your best option. This isn't rocket surgery, but knowledge IS power! Best wishes! [​IMG]
     
  9. Rosey516

    Rosey516 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I didn't realize that , only two are laying so the majority aren't.. maybe I will just finish the starter and compensate with oyster shell so the layers will get the calcium.. what do u think? I don't know much about health and chicks yet thanks for insight..
     
  10. GC-Raptor

    GC-Raptor Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Rosey516 Sure just finish up the starter with oyster shell on the side.
    Squeeze the air out of the bag of layers feed, put on a bag clip to keep closed and put in the coolest room in the house to help keep it fresh. GC
     

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