mixing flock with NPIP birds

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by luckydux, Dec 22, 2013.

  1. luckydux

    luckydux Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Is it okay to mix NPIP chicks with non-NPIP chicks? I'm not sure exactly how the program works so I'm curious if NPIP flocks are vaccinated and if so it seems there would be a problem with mixing them.

    I'm looking at ordering some more chicks and realized I never thought about this possible issue. I don't vaccinate for anything.
     
  2. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    I'm not sure what diseases are covered by NPIP certification. The big issue with mixing chicks from different sources is the risk of one batch of chicks
    transmitting disease to the other batch. I'm guessing that you're considering getting chicks from a hatchery and from a local breeder? Where are the non- NPIP chicks coming from?

    I'm planning to hatch some chicks this spring, and coordinating the hatch with arrival of hatchery chicks. At this time, I don't have a source for eggs, but I plan to take my chances. My understanding is that most flocks, including hatchery flocks are carriers of several common poultry diseases.

    Any one in the know about this question, please chime in, I'm sure there are a lot of folks who would appreciate knowledgeable response to this question. F/U question: What about combining batches of chicks from different hatcheries???
     
  3. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    NPIP is different in each state. NPIP is a combined state/federal program where it has minimum standards for testing for certain diseases but each state has its own way to go about it and many add additional requirements. There are no vaccinations involved. The flock is tested for certain diseases. If they are found to not have the specific diseases they are tested for, they are certified free of those diseases.

    In Arkansas the requirements are testing for pullorum-typhoid. The flock has to be tested and found pullorum-typhoid free before they can be certified NPIP. The certificate is valid for 90 days before more testing is involved. Individuals can attend a class offered a couple of times a year to become certified to do this testing. Each poultry show can set its own requirements for disease testing, but as a minimum they should require NPIP.

    Any hatchery that ships chicks across state lines has to meet the NPIP requirements of the state they are going into. For example, Virginia had a requirement that many hatcheries could not meet, not because their chicks were diseased but because there was no lab available in their state to test for that specific disease. I’m not sure if Virginia changed that requirement or not, but some hatcheries could not ship to Virginia because of that.

    Pullorum used to be pretty common in the USA but because of NPIP it’s now pretty rare.

    I don’t vaccinate either and I never worry about hatchery chicks from a reputable hatchery. If they regularly shipped diseased chicks they’d soon be out of business.
     
  4. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    So, in a nutshell, you would not be concerned about mixing hatchery chicks with home hatched chicks? What about buying hatching eggs from non NPIP sources?
     
  5. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    I would not be concerned about the hatchery chicks bringing in any diseases. I don’t know how to say that any clearer.

    Just because something might possibly happen does not mean it absolutely without a shadow of a doubt will 100% of each and every time. If you hatch eggs from an NPIP certified source in Arkansas, that means the flock has been tested for pullorum within the past 90 days. It also means that any chicken added to that flock has been tested. Maine may have different requirements. So the odds of the chicks hatched from those eggs are really great that those chicks will not introduce pullorum to your flock. It’s not 100%. You are dealing with living animals and with humans so anything is possible.

    The NPIP program has done a good job of reducing the number of flocks with pullorum in this country, but pullorum has not been eradicated. There are still flocks out there that are infected with it. I saw a post a couple of days ago where a lady had it in her flock.

    I have no idea what the odds are of the eggs you get from a non-NPIP source having pullorum. It’s either going to be 100% or zero percent, depending on your results. I’ve gotten eggs locally from a non-NPIP source and hatched them and not had any problems. The way NPIP has reduced the incidence of pullorum, I consider it a risk worth taking because I wanted to hatch those eggs. I have no idea what your results will be.
     
  6. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    If you are planning to have your flock NPIP certified you can only bring in birds from NPIP certified sources. If you don't plan to seek NPIP certification it really doesn't matter where you get birds. Wild birds are a much more likely source of disease than chickens from any source.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013
  7. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I think the only issue is if YOU are planning to be certified. If you are, you need to only bring in stock from certified facilities. If you're not planning on being certified, it really doesn't matter. The birds don't know if they're certified or not lol. I mix hatchery chicks and home hatched birds all the time. I've not bought hatching eggs, I would just do that on a case by case basis. If I were to buy hatching eggs, I would buy them from someone here on byc and do some research on the seller first.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013
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  8. luckydux

    luckydux Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for all the info folks and I'm glad hatching eggs was mentioned as well.

    Just to be clear I wasnt specifying hatchery chicks as the non NPIP birds. Just a bird from any source that isnt NPIP certified.

    The question i should of asked or at least researched is whether or not NPIP flocks are vaccinated more so than not. Is there any data anywhere with thoughts on this? Maybe a forum poll somewhere? :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2013
  9. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    Most everybody I know [ who breeds chickens] participates in he NPIP program & very few of them vaccinate. Not a scientific answer I know but NPIP certification & vaccination is kind of an apples & oranges thing-there's no real connection between the 2.
    I guess I'm not real clear as to what your actual concern is.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2013
  10. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    As far as my state is concerned it is illegal to ship any live chicks between states (in interstate commerce) unless the chicks being shipped have a flock NPIP health certificate.

    Furthermore it may or it may not be legal for you to possess such chicks or chickens without some other conditions being met. I am specifically talking about a vet certificate of health. The vet certificate usually applies to adult fowl and is something usually seen in international trade, but that might not matter to the state were you live.

    To me the real question should have been, "Is it ok to mix chicks from NON NPIP sources with chicks from NPIP certified disease free flocks?" When the question is asked that way the answer is no.
     

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