mixing my own feed

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by chartssss34, Sep 20, 2010.

  1. chartssss34

    chartssss34 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2010
    I have 4 breeds and i want to stop buying pellets and want to mix my own feed ..

    do they need to be seperate for all the 4 seperate breeds? i keep them seperately...

    if so I have polish brahma cochin and light sussex breeds...

    can you also please give sample mix formulas that i can use...i have great access to sunflower seeds

    thanks in advance
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    Oh you have got to see Organics North's BYC page. He has a recipe on there that looks great.

    Also here are some links for you:
    http://www.lionsgrip.com/protein.html

    and

    http://www.greenerpasturesfarm.com/ChickenFeedRecipe.html

    You can feed the same feed to everyone, but the recommendations change based on age. Chicks should have 20% protein, grower feed is 17%, and layer feed is 16%. However, a lot of people give the flock raiser feed which I think is about 20%.

    More protein is ok (as long as it doesn't go overboard), and I have started being a little more liberal with my handfuls of pumpkin seeds thrown out for treats.

    Pearson's square and Kim's Rectangle are helpful for calculating all this.

    It is helpful to do a google search for the protein content of the foods you wish to feed. There is a variation in different websites, though- for example one website may say corn has 7% protein, and another might say 8%. I try not to get too picky.

    They pick out the food they like best anyway and then have a day every once in awhile where they have to eat the bottom of the barrel. That way they get a balanced diet.
     
  3. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    The mix I'm using right now includes:
    corn (organic)
    oats
    hard red wheat
    wheat bran
    millet
    split peas
    peanuts
    sunflower seeds


    Then when I use up my split peas (which they don't really like) and wheat bran (which is kind of dusty) I'm going over to:
    alfalfa meal
    rolled oats
    hard red wheat
    millet
    sunflower seeds
    pumpkin seeds
    organic corn


    Now I also add about 1/2 part of DE (diatomaceous earth) and kelp meal (but don't trust my amounts on these, maybe look it up?)

    Also sea salt, oyster shell, and grit (the salt is important) are free choice in a pan. And they DO eat the salt and grit!
     
  4. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    I'd be happy to give you my exact amounts that I use in my recipe, and you would have to realize that it is possible that I made a mistake in my calculations of protein, etc.!

    [​IMG]
     
  5. chartssss34

    chartssss34 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2010
    thanks for the kind reply...peas will be problematic to source where i am...hence i will use the alfa alfa... instead...i will be very happy if you can share the exact amounts you use
     
  6. couponsaver47

    couponsaver47 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 14, 2010
    Don't mean to jack your thread but "Uh Um", sorry, I just wanted to ask Chickens, Why do you use the DE in your feed mix? Just wondering. Newbie here!! LOL!!
    I'm going to sit & watch how your mix comes out. Let us Know. Good luck!
     
  7. Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay

    Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:DE, Diatomacious Earth, supposedly has anti-parasitic properties. However, the scientific community has yet to elucidate responses when evaluated in controlled studies.
     
  8. Organics North

    Organics North Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 30, 2009
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    Quote:Hi,
    Why do you want to mix your own feed? Attempt to save money? No feed in your area that meets your requirement? Because of your principals?

    I do it for the above three reasons and others. It requires dedication and time, and one must educate themselves to a certain degree on the nutritional value of various food stuffs.

    I make one feed for all birds. I free choice oyster shells for layers, boost protein for starter and grower and so forth. Just make minor adjustments to one basic feed.

    With that said. Alfalfa is a great feed component. I think the protein is around 17%, it is a great source of green when their is no green on their range, or the birds are confined......
    .....IMO Alfalfa is NOT a substitute for peas or beans. (Even though it is a legume.) I suppose if you fed alfalfa seed that could work.

    Field peas are at around 24% protein, soy beans at around 34%. Legumes in a feed mix help balance things like corn and help boost protein levels...

    It seems to me that most that mix their own feed, use many many types of ingredients. (Diversity in feed stuff is the "key" to making a successful home made feed.)

    ON
     
  9. Organics North

    Organics North Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 30, 2009
    Wisconsin Northwoods
    Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay :

    DE, Diatomacious Earth, supposedly has anti-parasitic properties. However, the scientific community has yet to elucidate responses when evaluated in controlled studies.

    WOW! I think that should be the "official" BYC answer...
    [​IMG]

    ON​
     
  10. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Ohio
    Quote:I agree.

    Now comparing/ substituting Alfalfa with Peas or Beans is like Comparing/ substituting Apples and Oranges.
    Alfalfa and Peas/ Beans are both a Legume like Organics North has said but they are nutritionally different. Most people that add Alfalfa weather it be pellet or meal form use it as a substitute for pasturing or free ranging there chickens. Some breeders will increase the amount of Alfalfa intake of there birds in the winter when either snow will not permit it or the pasture is "dead".

    Chris
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2010

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