mixing species of quail

Discussion in 'Quail' started by quailfarm14, Aug 10, 2014.

  1. quailfarm14

    quailfarm14 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 29, 2014
    Does anyone mix differant quail species together?
     
  2. thinkloically

    thinkloically Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 13, 2013
    Frisco,Texas
    It's challenging and I've heard it has bad results.
     
  3. James the Bald

    James the Bald Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 6, 2013
    What would be the intended purpose?
    • If it is to save on cages, then I would recommend waiting until you had another cage, and raise each species separately.
    • If it is to create a hybrid, read this link.
    • If the species you are wanting to mix are Bobwhite and Coturnix, read this link.
    Wish I had a better reply, but this question has been asked so many times... at least a dozen times since I've joined here.

    James
     
  4. royalron

    royalron Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 16, 2014
    i have texas a&m with italian pharaoh the truth i dont know if its bad but its the only pen i have at this time till im done with the other one then i will separate them .i do got 48 eggs in the incubator do to hatch on the 14 th ill let ever one know how it comes out.
     
  5. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    These are just different colors of coturnix not different species of quail. Pharaoh, italian, manchurian, english white, A&M, rosetta, tuxedo, tibetan, etc. are all coturnix quail and can breed freely since they are the same species.

    Mixing species can work in a large (2-300 sq ft.) aviary setting but in hobby sized cages will be pretty rough on the birds. Gamebirds are very aggressive and very territorial so trying to make quail species from all over the world get on in a small cage is going to be nearly impossible. That is leaving aside the possiblity for hybridization. Hybridizing quail is typically a brutal process on the hen. To the point it would be hard to call it anything but cruel. Most often any eggs are infertile and in the cases where they can generate offspring those will be mules (infertile).
     

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