Mobile Heat Lamp with Deep Cycle Battery--Can It Be Done?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by gatrapper, Jul 3, 2016.

  1. gatrapper

    gatrapper Out Of The Brooder

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    Hey Y'all,

    I have a vacant coop that it 100 yards from the nearest power source. I want to use the coop to brood chicks, but I have to figure out a way to make a mobile heat source.

    I have 2 deep cycle batteries. Is there a way that I could wire the heat lamps to the batteries? Would I need some type of capacitor to regulate the energy from the batteries so it doesn't burn up the lights?

    Thanks
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    I would think it would be easier to run either a long extension cord temporarily,or run a buried wire out there and put in an outlet and light.
     
  3. gatrapper

    gatrapper Out Of The Brooder

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    100 yards of extension cord would be too expensive.
     
  4. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    If you can, burying wire in conduit, or whatever is legal where you live, is a one- time expense that will be worth it. We rented a trencher and dug it in ourselves, with proper hookups at each end. At least look into the possibilities before buying something else. Also, can your outbuilding be moved to a better location? We did that here also. Or brood in something else closer to the house. Mary
     
  5. azjustin

    azjustin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A 100w 110v heat lamp would draw 8.3 amps at 12 volts continuously, not counting losses from your inverter.

    A 250w 110v heat lamp would draw 20.8 amps at 12 volts continuously, not counting losses from your inverter.

    A deep cycle battery (or any rechargeable battery) has the longest longevity if you don't run it lower than 80% capacity without charging. You can count on your hands how many times it will cycle to 20% or lower.

    So, a 100 amp hour battery (CCA is for starting, AH is for deep cycle) can be run for a little less than 2.5 hours with a 100 watt bulb and a little less than one hour with a 250 watt bulb and be discharged to 80% capacity. Again, this is just ohms law and doesn't account for any inverter or wire losses. The bigger the battery, or more of them, and it will increase the time below a deep discharge. BUT, how are you going to recharge the batteries without grid power?

    Long story short: sure, you can heat with batteries if you like buying batteries.

    You could also super insulate a small enclosure and find a temperature regulated propane catalytic heater. Or, just get some conduit and run a line out to the coop, but that won't be cheap. Moving the coop might be easier?

    We brood close to the house since the little ones can take a fair amount of attention, and I don't walk for a living.

    Good luck.
     
  6. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    These 100' cords are $13.41 at Walmart.... Extension Cord

    You're still looking at $45 with tax, though, for three of them. You'd have a good bit of resistance in 300' of 16-gauge wire, but the incandescent bulb should still heat up...the extension cord might heat up a little bit, too.

    As azjustin noted, the battery application just ain't gonna work.

    Best wishes,
    Ed
     
  7. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp Chillin' With My Peeps

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