Modern game swallowed string

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Kelpie, Apr 7, 2009.

  1. Kelpie

    Kelpie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2008
    Charles Town, WV
    I found her with feed bag string wrapped tight around her jaw and going down her throat. As soon as I cut it it went the rest of the way down. The vet said corn oil or laxitone. She is lethargic and sometimes shudders in pain. Any other suggestions? Thanks!
     
  2. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    How long do you thing the piece of string inside the bird might be? Do you think it is still in the crop or farther along? This bird may require crop surgery and I'd call the vet back asap.
     
  3. twzlrwho

    twzlrwho Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 23, 2009
    South VA
    Oh how scary. I am so sorry and wish you the best of luck! [​IMG]
     
  4. Kelpie

    Kelpie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2008
    Charles Town, WV
    Thanks for the quick reply. I think the string is likely very long if it's from a feed bag, a few feet probably. Though I can't imagine her swallowing all that. I guess she started and could not stop. She did just poop (no string yet) so I am going to watch her a bit longer to see if it will pass before I go to the vet. The poop was mostly normal but contained a little bit of pink membrane which I worry could be intestine. I'll try to get a pic up.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2009
  5. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yes it could be twisted in her gut.
    Very sorry you and she are suffering this and I wish you the best outcome.
    If her crop seems okay and you believe the sring is not at the top of the digestive system you could feed a little bread which will expand her gut and possibly aid in expelling the string. Soak in oil first. I'm hoping that the grit in her crop may have frayed the string adequately and it might travel in smaller bits. But if her crop is packed don't try that...
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2009
  6. Kelpie

    Kelpie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2008
    Charles Town, WV
    The bread was a great idea, she is eating it right up. I hope it will gently push the string through.
     
  7. Kelpie

    Kelpie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2008
    Charles Town, WV
    I don't think her crop is packed, couldn't feel anything and I don't think she want bread if it was. Thank for the kind words and advice.
     
  8. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    A long time ago I had a housecat attack a cooling pork roast, and she ate a whole round of string with a knot. When some of it appeared at her anus the vet cautioned us not to tug at it and if we couldn't get it, not to cut it, to bring her in asap. We did get it out over several hours, I remember having to assist her abdominal muscles with gentle pressure, responding to her pain and her voiding, but it scared the heck out of me.

    A chicken's gut is more favorably designed to grind things at the crop and then push it through. Since they produce droppings every 20 min or so, it's more likely for a chicken to have a good outcome. Believe me, I'm hoping for the very best for her and you- I know you're working hard to save her. Since she ate the bread, the string is likely well past her crop and wihin a few hours that string should appear, possibly in pieces and partly digested.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2009
  9. Kelpie

    Kelpie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2008
    Charles Town, WV
    She is pushing now, almost like an eggbound hen will, so I hope something comes out. Chicken digestive tracks move faster than I expected.
     
  10. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    If she strains too much you can assist her by bracing the abdominal muscles with your fingers. Since she is aware of your efforts and if she will allow it, this might prevent a prolapse, and it is possible she may be trying to lay.
     

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