Moisture in Coop/Shed

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by tdgill, Apr 15, 2009.

  1. tdgill

    tdgill Chillin' With My Peeps

    I have to resolve this asap. I'm thinking my shed needs raised or moved...I never noticed how damp my shed could feel until I put my dear chickies in it! I have lamps out there at the moment and everyone seems comfy, but I am worried about the humidity and dampness until I can raise the shed or move it to a better location. Its on a stone bed but it seems that it holds moisture under it. Granted, it has been miserable and rainy here and I am hoping that as long as they are able to stay warm and dry, that the "ambient" dampness won't be a real issue for the time being.

    You can see where the bottom of the T-111 has started to rot, I thought it was from lack of gutters. (gutters might help direct more water away from the shed) I believe drawing moisture up from the ground.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2009
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    T-111 will wick up water if it touches the ground. How much ventilation do you have? In a moist environment, it's especially important to have places near the ceiling for the moisture to escape.
     
  3. Giddyup

    Giddyup Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Good ventilation, no drafts, and no water touching the bottom of coop. We live in a damp climate and good ventilation is the key for storage feed and health of critters. Gutters will help direct the water away in rainfall, and perhaps adding some drain pipes may be an answer rather than lifting your coop, or as well as?
     
  4. lilchick

    lilchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Having your building up on a stone pad is much better than on the ground.
    Make sure you keep the bedding dry by changing it out or stirring it up. Especially in the corners....
    I found that reducing the no. of birds in one of my barns solved the moisture problem.....

    If they stay confined the barn can get damp alot quicker..

    Opening all windows and doors during the day helps keep my barns dry also...
    A building in complete shade can get damp .... Ours gets several hours of sunlight...
     
  5. flopshot

    flopshot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    if it's sitting on stone it's creating a moist environment by trapping ground moisture. you could either lift it a few inches or use a vapor barrier under it like six mil plastic. you would have to make sure the plastic does not funnel water under the structure.
     
  6. tdgill

    tdgill Chillin' With My Peeps

    Just the typical ridge vent and 2 windows facing North, plus a barn door on the south side. We planned on adding vents up high also. Its alot draftier than I believed as well. Around the doors mainly...but i have the chickens kinda boxed in at the moment hoping that would keep them outa any drafts. We bought insulation last weekend. I will go take pictures.

    [​IMG]

    ok. here's the funny part. yes, thats a basketball court and yes, the shed is off to the side. smart huh. oh well, the kids got alot of enjoyment outa the court.

    [​IMG]

    the barn door faces south and the shed does get alot of sun especially in the afternoon. We have a shade tree thats just starting to help out some.
    I think most of my problem is drainage and grading. thinking we should move (on rollers or something?) it forward onto the concrete pad now.
    I really think we should do something drastic if possible. I guess I have to research moving it or lifting it. [​IMG]

    thanks for the reminders on venting. Any suggestions on what kind or how big and where?
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2009
  7. lilchick

    lilchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What I meant by building is better on a stone pad is so the air can flow under building because it is on treated runners. Cement floor will be damp as well as setting right on the dirt. If you do put it on the cement be sure to put treated runners under it or blocks to hold it off the ground..
    Vents up high under the peak would help with the hot air and moisture in the barn.
    I also use a fan in one window turned so it is venting out. Other windows open to draw in fresh air. Works better than fan blowing on them....
     
  8. vermontgal

    vermontgal Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aside from any actual drainage issues, it looks like your T-111 is suffering from:
    a. Lack of roof overhang, and
    b. Splash-up from rain falling on the pavement right next to it (due to lack of roof overhang).
     
  9. flopshot

    flopshot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:i totally agree with this. install a length of gutter when you repair the wall. i don't see why you couldn't use a circular saw and rip off a two foot section of the bottom and replace. prime and caulk the edges as the panel is installed to seal the joint and you should be good.
     
  10. Slywoody

    Slywoody Chillin' With My Peeps

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    From looking at your pics, at least from what i can see of your coop, you don't have near the ventilation you need to keep it dry inside. The rot along the bottom looks like it's coming from the roof due to no overhang. Cut some holes up in the peaks and cover with wire or screen. Look for Pat's "Big ol' Ventilation Page". I'd find it and send it, but i'm not puter savvy. Maybe someone else can help with that,, Good Luck,,, Woody
     

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