Mold and fodder

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by cbrown4, May 15, 2016.

  1. cbrown4

    cbrown4 New Egg

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    Feb 8, 2016
    I have a micro fodder system. I'm having a terrible time with MOLD. Every time my fodder is growing it's fuzzy. Of course I don't this to my ladies as I don't want them getting sick.

    I've tried adding a little bleach to the water that my pump is. But I still get mold.
    I've even tried putting a fan so that it blows on the fodder thinking maybe it's getting warm and needs are circulating. But still mold.

    I don't know how what else to do. I have both barley and wheat but they both do that same thing. Mold every time.
    If someone can give me an idea as to what to do, I'd greatly appreciate it.

    Cinda

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  2. azjustin

    azjustin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We did great with fodder in the winter, but now that it's basically summer, waaaaayy too hot for fodder. Same as you, lots of mold and frustration.

    Try the usuals: wash with a hydrogen peroxide solution, keep your water clean, keep temps down.

    I'm working on a fodder with dirt hybrid, but nothing notable to post yet.

    Good luck.
     
  3. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    rinse more frequently and move air with a fan.

    a shorter soak at the beginning (about 1-2 hours) will start germination sooner than a longer soak so that will cut down on fungus along with more rinsing with fresh water
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2016
  4. mimsy

    mimsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sterilize everything you are going to use before hand.

    I like to soak my seed in water with a cap full of hydrogen peroxide. I soak over night or so, rinsing a couple of times. I only add the hydrogen peroxide with the first water.

    After that rinse often. There is really no such thing as too much rinsing.

    We've had a lot of hot weather here already and I've not seen any fuzz.
     
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    X2

    I saw a study comparing a 1 hour soak, an 8 hour soak and a 24 hour soak. The 1 hour soak grain grew fastest, followed by the 8 hour though it was slower. The 24 hour soak really struggled getting started and never caught up. The theory is that it bloated too much.
    I still shoot for 2 hours.
     
  6. mimsy

    mimsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    there was a recent one I saw that did one on a short soak, I can't remember if it was 1 or 2 hours and then one that was 16 hours. The initial sprouting was roughly the same, however the growth of the long soak at 5 days was twice that of the short soak.

    I wonder if it is depended on the seed used, such as how hard is the outer layer. Could also be something in their soak, such as myself using the peroxide in the first soak. I notice the wheat seed is usually sprouting at the end of the soak stage, where as Sunflower seed takes a bit of time.
     
  7. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    I guess the answer is "your results may vary"
    A critical factor is optimal temperature for the seed you're sprouting.
    I usually use barley as I get the best results with it.
    In my case, sunflower seed sprouts very quickly here.
    These people soak 12 hours and grow at 71-75 F trying to lower humidity and keep air flowing.


    Here's the video of a comparison of 30 minute, 12 hour and 24 hour soaks over a 6 day period.

    The difference convinced me to try a shorter soak and I've had much better luck since.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2016

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