Molting? Feathers everywhere!!!!

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by chickentender8, Oct 17, 2013.

  1. chickentender8

    chickentender8 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 19, 2012
    I have an Ameracauna, in the last few days she has lost ALOT of feathers. It does not look like she is molting, it looks like she is either pulling her feathers out or they are just falling out. I put her in another pen away from the other hens, because she seems to always be the one who gets picked on, but not lately, all the girls were doing fine and getting along. I can see her skin on her back, and the pen looks like a chicken exploded in it!! Feathers everywhere. I put her sister in with her so she would not stress out about being alone, but I just do not know why she is losing all her feathers. Does anyone have any ideas?
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Have you had birds molt before?

    It sounds like a hard molt to me and the right time of year. Molting is usually in a bird's second autumn and every autumn thereafter.
    A hard molt is when they lose most of the feathers at once and IMO is preferable because it usually only lasts a month or so. A soft molt lasts much longer because the feathers are lost and replaced in much slower progression.

    Exploding chicken or pillow fight are good descriptions of when a bird/birds is in full molt.

    Put them back with the flock and up the protein.
     
  3. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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  4. chickentender8

    chickentender8 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you!! How should I add protein to her diet, what are good sources of protein?
     
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Meat, fish, dairy, Sunflower seed. crickets, mealworms, grower feed, etc..
     
  6. chickentender8

    chickentender8 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks!! We tried to give her some meat and fish, but she won't eat any of it. We will keep trying. I had to put her in a pen by herself, because the other hens were not being to nice to her. It is a good sized pen, it is covered and has a roost in it. If it gets too cold I will turn the heat lamp on for her. I am a little worried because she does not seem to be eating much, she loves treats, bread, grapes, beans, but she won't eat any of it. Does molting affect their appetite?
     
  7. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

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    Mealworms are fantastic protein. (any bug really) If you don't like them live, they sell them freeze dried. You can also switch their feed to Game Bird Starter - Purina's is 30% protein.
     
  8. chickentender8

    chickentender8 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you!
     
  9. kjfrogster41

    kjfrogster41 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 30, 2011
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    I am experiencing the same issue as "just hatched". One of my girls is doing a serious molt, the others less so. I have been attempting additional protein but they are not eating much of any thing. Mostly they just want to roost or stand in the corner of their pen. Of course they are not laying either but I kind of expected that along with a molt (this is our first major molt), egg laying stops. I am worried about the lack of appetite, as they have all always eaten everything and just about any thing they can get their beaks around. I will say they are all plump hens but all that naked skin and the weather has been getting down to freezing the last few nights. Should I be bringing them in where they will be warmer? What can I feed them? They are eating a bit of corn and meal worms but won't touch their pellet feed or any other vegetable scraps. Thanks for advice!
     

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