Molting = Tired?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by jjthink, Aug 23, 2007.

  1. jjthink

    jjthink Overrun With Chickens

    4,617
    20
    264
    Jan 17, 2007
    New Jersey
    Can molting make a bird tired, sleepy? I have a 6 or 7 year old roo that is dozing off in the late afternoons while standing up outside - he is molting. He went to bed early tonight.

    I am adding some good quality cat crunchies to his diet for extra protein - he wants them badly but I don't know how much so have been perhaps too stingy.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2007
  2. SpottedCrow

    SpottedCrow Flock Goddess

    Jeeze our poor BJ!
    You could put them out free choice for a couple of days...most times they have way too much salt but for a couple of days, it couldn't hurt.
    I've even noticed Obelisk wanting to just lay around. She's having a really bad moult this year...She's got half a naked neck and no tail feathers. And grumpy as anything too.
     
  3. ella

    ella Chillin' With My Peeps

    Molting can really take it out of them. Any other issues like a mild virus or something will come out too, making it a stressful time.

    I switch over to chick feed during the molt and just keep a full dish of oyster shell for the girls who are still laying. I've found that the chick starter really helps them out, with higher protien and fat content.
     
  4. jjthink

    jjthink Overrun With Chickens

    4,617
    20
    264
    Jan 17, 2007
    New Jersey
    Thank you both [​IMG]
    With any luck, it is just the molting (perhaps combined with age - I don't know just how old 6 or 7 is for chickens).
    Increasing protein further.
    My next trick is going to be trying to get them through the high heat and over the moon dew points the new few days..........
     
  5. schlitch

    schlitch Out Of The Brooder

    91
    1
    29
    Aug 2, 2007
    Raymond, Mississippi
    Do roos molt as often and just like the hens?
     
  6. ella

    ella Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yup, they need to replace the feathers once a year or they'd get all worn out and don't insulate well.

    Some individuals molt quickly and have a period of time where they are nearly bald, others molt so slowly you wouldn't notice unless you fluff up the feathers and see the new ones growing in. Fast or slow is an individual thing and has nothing to do with gender.

    I love how soft and shiny they are when they're done molting.[​IMG]
     
  7. schlitch

    schlitch Out Of The Brooder

    91
    1
    29
    Aug 2, 2007
    Raymond, Mississippi
    I asked because I have a friend that has 5 RIR hens that appear to be in full molt, but their 1 RIR rooster does not. I also think that some of the hen's lack of feathers may have been due to the rooster and he has now been separated from them.

    Thanks for the response!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by