Molting?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by MissJenny, Nov 26, 2010.

  1. MissJenny

    MissJenny Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 11, 2009
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    I am a big believer that Mother Nature knows what she's doing. Calves are born in spring, on certain trees the leaves turn up to catch rain... so now that the temperatures have taken a nosedive my hens are losing their feathers? What's up with that -- they need their feathers. I don't get it.

    Jenny
     
  2. coldwetnoz

    coldwetnoz Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 22, 2010
    It's probably just a late molt that was supposed to take place a few weeks ago. If your state is anything like ours (SC) we have crazy weather this time of the year. 75 in the daytime and down to 30's at night. They'll probably get new feathers in right away.

    Pauline
     
  3. MissJenny

    MissJenny Chillin' With My Peeps

    974
    3
    141
    May 11, 2009
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Our weather has been irrational lately -- way too warm and then suddenly cold. I certainly hope she gets her feather back in fairly quickly. I've been giving them all an extra serving of salmon for the protein -- hope it helps!

    My other ones molted earlier and not quite so heavily. Now that it's cold I've got this one looking like a Raggedy Chicken.

    Jenny
     
  4. coldwetnoz

    coldwetnoz Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 22, 2010
    Well, maybe you should take that one in at night until she feathers out. With my Seramas, I always bring them in to the porch cage and cover with a blanket on nights below freezing. But Seramas are a breed from the tropics so it's worse for them. You can even put them in a well ventilated cardboard box on a cold night and along with their own heat, it's nice and warm.

    I buy the cheap brand of minced canned dog food and give it to my chickens occasionally.

    Pauline
     

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