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MORE NEEDED TO WINTERIZE COOP?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by SillyBird, Nov 30, 2016.

  1. SillyBird

    SillyBird Out Of The Brooder

    79
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    Sep 4, 2015
    Nova Scotia
    Hi,
    Here's some photos of our new coop. The inside does not have a 'ceiling'...it is open to the metal roof/rafters. Do you think more needs to be done to keep it 'warmer' in the winter? It can get very cold here with wind chills minus 30 plus during the worst winter months. I realize they need fresh air, but no drafts, and this will be our first winter with this coop. I plan to put a few pieces of plywood over the roost area and where the meat king pet lies...as like a 'false low ceiling'. (Please note: There will be a better roost installed for the two laying hens), As much as I'd like to put heat lamps in there...sources say to NOT do this for many reasons...so I will stay away from them. Thanks folks for your thoughts.

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  2. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

    12,673
    5,412
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    Feb 25, 2014
    Northwestern Wyoming
    My Coop
    Wind chill has no effect on chickens as long as they are out of the wind, and your setup allows for that so you should be golden there. Your winters there are about the same temperature wise as ours, but you have the added humidity from living near the sea that we don't have here. Our winters are dry - shoot, even our abundant snow is drier than yours.

    Moisture and humidity are the real issues in winter, not the actual cold. If you have winter hardy breeds or varieties and good ventilation, you should be set to go. Humidity comes from their respiration, their droppings, the waterer, condensation from having the coop too tightly buttoned up, leaks and blowing snow getting in.

    I never thought I'd say this, but you might have too much space for so few birds in winter. [​IMG]If I read your post correctly (and lately I've been misreading some posts, believe me - sigh) you have 3 birds. Part of them keeping warm is them huddling together and their combined body heat keeping the space a little warmer than outside. Three birds can't really do that effectively in such an open space. Can you section a bit off for winter so they'd be kept closer together without sacrificing the ventilation you have so successfully incorporated, and not have that partition be too small? It can be just something temporary so that during the warmer months they have that entire amazing coop to use. Even a four sided wooden box-type structure around the roost area while leaving the front open would work. Sort of like a loafing shed - just a wall on 3 sides and a slanted roof - that could be picked up and moved out the rest of the year. I am a bit jealous, by the way! I'd give my last dime for such a setup! Who am I kidding? I used my last dime on the setup I have! [​IMG] In summer that "loafing shed" would work placed in a corner with the front having hardware cloth on it to make a great outdoor brooder or recovery pen, so you'd get double use from it.

    I'm hoping someone else chimes in here and tells me I'm way off base about the size in relation to the number of birds being kept. While all of us advise to build as big as possible and would love to have as much room as you have, in winter things are a bit different. But if I'm wrong about the partitioned, temporary space holding in some extra warmth, I'm sure someone will say, "Blooie, what are you thinking?"
     
  3. SillyBird

    SillyBird Out Of The Brooder

    79
    8
    43
    Sep 4, 2015
    Nova Scotia
    I really enjoyed your response and appreciate your thoughts Blooie and yes, there are too few birds for such a space, especially for keeping warm in the winter. I will be getting more someday. The idea of making a four sided, open in the front, box/area around the roost area is even better than my thoughts of putting a piece of plywood over top the area to make a lower 'ceiling'. We'll have to work on that very soon. For the meat king, same thing, but on the ground for her. Thanks.
     

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