(more) Newbie incubator questions...

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by arlee453, Oct 18, 2007.

  1. arlee453

    arlee453 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 13, 2007
    near Charlotte NC
    OK, for those who haven't seen the original thread... I made my own bator out of a rubber maid cooler.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=19675

    Now, for my question of the day...

    I let it run overnight (still 60 wt bulb, but took the thermostat off the wall and placed on the floor, which seemed to really help with the wide temp swings )

    Now, with the temp probe in the water wiggler, I've been watching the light go on and off this morning.

    Here's the probe temps as it went on and off:
    On: 98.2
    Off: 100.0
    On: 98.2
    Off: 100.0
    On: 98.2
    Off 100.1

    I am shooting for 99.5 avg in the water wiggler. I'm thinking I need to adjust temp slightly up to get it more in the range of 99 to 101 as it cycles on and off.

    Also, on humidity - I've got it up to 78%. Is it a problem if the humidity is that high for the first 2 weeks? I know you start lower and then bump it up for the hatching...maybe I need to add some venting holes for the humidity issue? I don't have any vent holes at this point, but will be lifting the lid to turn the eggs manually.

    Any thoughts on these questions? I've got EGGS coming next week (thanks Jen) and want to make sure I've got it right!

    Thanks in advance!!
    Susan
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Those temps are not bad, but if you could adjust it upward ever so slightly and see what happens, you may get the temps you want.
    Yes, that humidity the first two weeks would probably drown the babies. The aircell will not be large enough for them to pip into. It needs to be 50% or less. Maybe you need more ventilation in it. Cant remember if you drilled holes around the bottom or not, but you need a little airflow-remember these are living breathing critters and the eggs basically breathe. That may help the humidity issue, to get more airflow.
     
  3. arlee453

    arlee453 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 13, 2007
    near Charlotte NC
    I will drill some holes to vent the humidity and I suppose then you just plug them up if the humidity drops too low??

    I'm going to bump up the temps ever so slightly too and then back to watching the light go on and off [​IMG]

    Thanks for the wisdom!!

    Susan
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I have never had humidity lost excessively through my small airholes, but you do need ventilation for the chicks to be able to hatch. Just a few holes drilled around the middle, even 1/8" if you're scared to make them too big. See what happens after that and if you need to, make a few of those holes 1/4" instead and check again. Those holes I'm talking about never get plugged. Every foam bator has holes all the way around the base of it, very small holes for air to come in. You can drill a larger hole and use something to plug and unplug to release humidity.
     
  5. Poison Ivy

    Poison Ivy Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 2, 2007
    Naples, Florida
    Just keep checking the max temps on your thermometer. I didn't at first and I was getting spikes of over 103*. I now set my thermometer to stay on the max setting so I can see what they are. But I don't use the homemade one to much anymore as a incubator but I use it as a hatcher.
     

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