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Mother Cluckers Coop design (and eventually build pics)

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Jrobinsonmtplus3, May 30, 2017.

  1. Jrobinsonmtplus3

    Jrobinsonmtplus3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2017
    Hey all!
    I wanted to get a thread going for our coop design, and build so I can eventually add pics of the process.
    Our chicks are scheduled to hatch next week, and we have 8 chicks coming of 4 different breeds.
    My requirements were that the coop be built to house at least 8-10 hens (we have a 40x12'8 run that will be built in the beginning of august, and are going to do a smaller run to start.)

    So the plans are an 8'x8' coop with a storm door that has a pop door and windows that are screened built in.
    The roof will slope to accommodate rain fall, and pine needles falling on it for little accumulation.

    We choose an 8x8 because it will leave us with enough room in the coop for the girls, and the least amount of cutting of the plywood.
    We choose to have the nest boxes on the outside to give more floor space inside in case of inclement weather ( we are in semi coastal SC and do get some hurricane weather and random storms that last for days)
    These are very preliminary drawings so be patient! lol! Design may change as time goes on...

    Interior I plan to have the roosts on the south side with food and water on the West.
    We plan to use the Deep Litter method.

    Ok I think that's all for now! Off to price lumber!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. PapaBear4

    PapaBear4 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 25, 2014
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    Looks good! I have a few thoughts to share, I assume you're looking for feedback.
    I didn't see where the windows would be other than the mesh (?) at the top of the west wall. In SC, abundant ventilation will be more important than wind protection.
    Also think about where you would put feed and water outside the coop in case you start to have a problem with wet bedding. Even if you don't have an issue, your bedding will last longer if they're eating and drinking outside for the most part.
    Nest boxes look a little on the large side. 12"x12" is plenty big unless you're raising a very large breed. But now I'm being picky.

    Keep up the great work!
     
    MamaChick74 likes this.
  3. Jrobinsonmtplus3

    Jrobinsonmtplus3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2017
    Thanks for the input!
    I may tweak the north wall to have either a run of lattice (similar to the west) or a window.
    I think we were just making the space for the nest boxes even with the 6 foot length between studs. I'll have to double check that.
    And good to know about feeding outside.
    I was just thinking for preditors not to be attracted to the area to feed inside the coop.
    Is that generally not an issue? Like possums and raccoons?
    We are in a neighborhood and have a fenced in yard.
     
  4. PapaBear4

    PapaBear4 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 25, 2014
    Maryland
    You're right that feed left out can attract scavengers. What you do depends on what equipment you have.
    We have both circumstances on our homestead. For my grow-out coop and run I hang the feeder out under the roof overhang during the day and put it just inside the coop man-door at night. So, no scavenger issues.
    For my producing layers' larger coop and run I have a 100lb range feeder that stays out all the time. I've never noticed tracks or scat in their run but I can't say they're not just being sneaky about their thievery.
     
  5. Jrobinsonmtplus3

    Jrobinsonmtplus3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2017
    The plans... they are a changing....

    After getting a quote for the original plans of $914, we adjusted a few things.
    Added venting to the north wall removed some non essential studs.
    We also adjusted from using treated wood all around to using it only on the roof and floor. HUGE $ saver. And better for the birds!
     

    Attached Files:

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