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Moved from a big city in the northeast to Bluegrass country

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by Rrwky, Jan 31, 2015.

  1. Rrwky

    Rrwky Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi,

    I recently moved to a very rural area after living in the city. I am enjoying my new experiences, but I have a lot to learn.

    Currently have four hens (one Golden Comet and three Rhode Island Reds). The Comet has been around for several seasons, but this is the Reds' first season. We recently went from getting about three eggs a day to one or two, sometimes none. The Comet pretty much lays one a day, but I don't know what's going on with the Reds? Out of three of them, we usually get one egg a day or none. Any suggestions as to why the change?

    I started a blog to catalogue my experiences moving from urban to rural life at newrurality.blogspot.com. Check it out and let me know what you think.
     
  2. Twistedfeather

    Twistedfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Welcome to BYC! It is winter birds tend to lay less because the level of lights are weird and it can get cold, are these pullets? (female chickens under a year?) it could be possible that they are just getting started or are in a molt do you see tons of feathers shed or bare spots? '

    Enjoy your stay!
     
  3. Rrwky

    Rrwky Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks twistedfeather. I don't see a lot of feathers shed, but there are more than usual. The Rhode Island Reds are pullets, born in March or April 2014. One of them (the largest) is particularly bossy. I almost wondered if it was a rooster, but there are no spurs.
     
  4. Twistedfeather

    Twistedfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Do you or can you get a picture?
     
  5. matt44644

    matt44644 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]
     
  6. Rrwky

    Rrwky Out Of The Brooder

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    I can. I will post it a little later today. Not at the homestead yet [​IMG]
     
  7. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    [​IMG] I'm glad you joined us!

    It is relatively normal for many chickens to stop laying (or at least slow down) at this time of year, even if they aren't molting. Shorter daylight hours don't stimulate egg production very well.
     
  8. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Welcome to BYC! [​IMG]I'm glad you joined us.

    The decreased daylight hours often make hens slow down or completely shut down in egg production during the fall and winter. If this is the case, they should increase egg production in the spring. Do you have a light in the coop?
     
  9. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    Welcome to BYC. Glad you decided to our flock. Golden Comet is one of a number of labels under which some hatcheries market their Red Sex Links, which are produced by crossing a red gene rooster with a silver gene hen. Not only can the offspring be sexed by color at hatching, but they are egg laying machines, outlaying either parent breed. It's one of the interesting quirks of hybridization. Please feel free to ask any questions you may have. We are here to help in any way we can. Good luck in getting eggs from your RIRs.
     
  10. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    Hens also grow spurs but not normally large like a rooster
     

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