Moving 12 pullets and 4 hens to a new coop.

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Tammy719, Oct 25, 2015.

  1. Tammy719

    Tammy719 Out Of The Brooder

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    We are in the process of building a bigger coop and run for our pullets. We have a hen that is about a year old that we think killed 2 of them so we want to split them up. They free range during the day and at night the pullets are still going to the coop we kept them in when they were babies. Its only supposed to hold 6 chickens and we currently have 12. I have a few hens that I would like to also add to the new coop with them. I want to separate the more aggressive "red Rangers" from all of them because they all pick on the pullets. I will probably not free range the aggressive ones for awhile until I feel they are all safe which is why I want to separate the other few hens from them as well. Any suggestions in doing this in the most stress free way would be appreciated.
     
  2. farm316

    farm316 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello,

    And welcome to Backyard Chickens!! Your trying to move the Hens and the pullets to a new coop, and want to section the more aggressive away from the mild. I would suggest when you have built the new coop, that you make it big enough for the mild and aggressive so that they will live on the opposite side of one another with a barrier in the middle.. That way they can familiar each-other. Preferably wire as the cross piece so they may come in contact with one another. Then maybe let them go together.
     
  3. Tammy719

    Tammy719 Out Of The Brooder

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    That's how they have been living for the past 4 months and as soon as we let them out they run to the pullet area. I think it's best we keep them separate. They just are not nice chickens. They even chase my cats! We have never had red Rangers before ans I won't have them again. If we butchered chickens they would be gone but we don't so I'm trying to be as nice as I can to them while keeping my other chickens safe.
     
  4. farm316

    farm316 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree..

    Dealing with aggressive hens is a no no, keep them as far away from the pullets. Don't let them free-range and don't let them have any contact with the pullets. Do you have any friends that cull?
     
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    It's about territory and resources(food/water/space)......not about 'mild' and 'mean'.
    Existing chickens will always pick on 'new' chickens unless you manage the integration.

    It can take time, patience, observation and understanding of their behaviors,
    but most birds can be integrated to live together given the proper space and resources.

    A little more info about the coops they are kept in and what the new coop will be would help us help you figure out how to get them all together.

    Size matters....dimensions of the coops (feet by feet), and who is living where?

    Is the new coop done...had any of them been living there?

    The 'red rangers' are meat chickens or layers?

    The pullets you raised from chicks?

    Ages and how long you've had each group would help to know.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015
  6. Tammy719

    Tammy719 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for your reply. The existing coop is 8x8 and only houses 8 hens. The pullet are still in the coop we had purchased for the babies. They both are connected at the run but have different run spaces so they only time they interact are when they free range and the aggressive hens have actually been caught holding pullet down by the neck before and they go into the pullets run to do it. If the pullet try to go within 10 feet on the hens they will chase them. We have mixed chickens before and I followed all the steps suggested and it's just these 3 red Rangers. My black australorp and rode island red hens don't bother them. Then new coop is almost ready and I don't plan to mix them. We just realized we list another Americana pullet. I will only let the red Rangers free range when I am around to supervise. The red Rangers are huge! They are a dual purpose bird and have to weight 7-8 lbs. my babies don't stand a chance with them if they actually get ahold of them.
     
  7. Tammy719

    Tammy719 Out Of The Brooder

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    No we dont! These girls are just not going yo be free range!
     
  8. Tammy719

    Tammy719 Out Of The Brooder

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    We have 5 hens that are 2 years old. The 3 that's are my "problem" hens are about 8 months old. The pullets are about 4-5 moths old and we have had them since they were 1 week old. They have. Had plenty of time to get used to living beside them. As I mentioned before they go straight into the run when I let them out. If the pullet are out them they can get away but if they are in the run eating or whatever then they trap them. All 3 have been killed in the run our their coop.
     
  9. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Having a brand new coop that neither group have lived in could be your keys to the kingdom.

    Remember it's about territory, brand new coop with multiple feed/water stations and lots of floor space and roosts, you should be able to put them all in at once....
    .....because it's all new territory.
     
  10. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    Personally, if you reread your posts, you have three birds that are ruining the flock. You would be much happier if they were gone. Put them on craigslist and don't ask any questions. Your flock will be happier. You will be happier.

    Flocks are tricky things and develop their own personality. I don't like a flock full of strife. Your birds are dealing with strife. You don't like those birds, let them go. We have all, or at least most of us, have gotten birds that we thought we were going to like, and for some reason, didn't work for us. You would enjoy this hobby more without those birds.

    Let them go,

    Mrs K
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015
    1 person likes this.

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