Moving Goats 1600 Miles!!!

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by ParadisePoultry, May 26, 2011.

  1. ParadisePoultry

    ParadisePoultry Hey, I'm WALKIN' here !

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    Oct 19, 2009
    Paradise (Braham), Mn
    Ok folks. We are moving from Minnesota to Maine on June 2nd. Chickens are going in the back of the mini-van. I am building custom cages in it. I have 4 Nigerians, 2 pregnant does, and 2 - 6 month doelings.

    They will be towed behind the van in a 4 x 8 foot utility trailer. Solid plywood sides. I have made a cover for it using plastic lattice(sp?) panels. We are going to take it real easy, as my son and his family is moving with me, and they have a 6 month old daughter.

    My questions:
    Should I attempt to make stalls in the trailer? Or should I tie them? Or should they all ride loose in the trailer? I want them to be comfortable. The 2 girls are due to kid in mid-July, and I'm scared to death they will mis-carry. Any suggestions?
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2011
  2. terrilhb

    terrilhb Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 11, 2010
    Georgia
    WOW what a brave soul you are. I am so sorry I have no advice I just want to wish you good luck and tell you to have a safe trip. Becareful.
     
  3. glenolam

    glenolam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2009
    Canterbury, CT
    It might be useful to put some type of slip reisistant mats down so they don't slide around too much. I'd also suggest covering the lattice with tarps from the inside or something to block the wind/weather. The more cozy they all are the better they'll be.

    Give them some probios before during and after the trip and keep scour halt or something like that.

    ETA - since there's only 4 of them and 2 are relatively small still, you may even think about only allowing them to have 1/2 the trailor for space. A 4x4 area is plenty big enough for 4 nigerians, especially since they'll be lying down most of the time anyway.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2011
  4. ParadisePoultry

    ParadisePoultry Hey, I'm WALKIN' here !

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    Oct 19, 2009
    Paradise (Braham), Mn
    Quote:Thanks, I love the idea of the mats. I'm also happy to know that they can get by in a smaller space. Because I would really like to put my Roosters in cages in the trailer. I really don't like the idea of diving 1600 miles with 8 roosters crowing all the time. The egg song is bad enough [​IMG]
     
  5. carolinagirl58

    carolinagirl58 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2011
    Lugoff, SC
    I agree....smaller space is better and safer for them as long as they have good air circulation. I think I'd put some vents in the sides since you will be moving during a hot part of the year. You can always close the vents if not needed. I'd put plenty of straw on the floor on top of slip resistant mats to insulate them from the heat of the road. Get some 5 gallon buckets of your own water and put lids on them for the trip. I think they'd do better with water they are used to.
     
  6. jettgirl24

    jettgirl24 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 21, 2010
    Duvall, WA
    Just another trick I've used on long haul trips with the horses.... If you put a short length of 2 x 4 in the 5 gallon water buckets it won't slosh out so you can put it in the trailer for them to have access to. When we haul horses they are tied and have separate slant load stalls so you may want to think about whether or not it's safe to have the goats loose in there with the buckets but I thought I'd throw it out there [​IMG]
     
  7. glenolam

    glenolam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2009
    Canterbury, CT
    Interesting jett - do you put the 2x4 across the top and secure it somehow or put it in length-wise? Why does it stop the water from sloshing out? I've never heard of this but it sounds like it could be a lifesaver!
     
  8. babyblue

    babyblue Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 23, 2009
    I would do some sort of anti slip mat with something absorbent on top. If they pee a lot that may make them slip. With the horses we did straw but they had fly masks on to keep debris from getting in their faces. On little goats perhaps old towels would do the trick.
     
  9. Peaches Lee

    Peaches Lee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 19, 2010
    Pennsylvania
    When I hauled my goat, who I believe is a Saanen cross, from PA to TX we kept her loose in the trailer. It was a horse trailer with rubber mats already installed, I did put sawdust and a flake of hay in. When we would stop for gas/food I would offer her water in a small bucket. The only thing about having her loose in there was she did try to pull a jail brake at a gas station somewhere in Illinois!! But, I still preferred having her loose in the trailer.

    Well anyway, good luck to you!!
     
  10. jettgirl24

    jettgirl24 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 21, 2010
    Duvall, WA
    Interesting jett - do you put the 2x4 across the top and secure it somehow or put it in length-wise? Why does it stop the water from sloshing out? I've never heard of this but it sounds like it could be a lifesaver!

    Honestly I have no idea why it keeps the water from sloshing out but it works! I suppose if you're driving on a really rough dirt road it may still slosh but for freeway driving I've had no trouble with sloshing.

    You don't have to secure it, just cut it to a length that fits in the bucket and float it on the top of the water [​IMG]
     

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