Moving our chicks in with our 1 lone Guinea hen........ updated

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by hawtchick, Jul 5, 2008.

  1. hawtchick

    hawtchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 11, 2008
    New Hampshire
    Our chicks (10) have been in a homemade dog kennel brooder on our porch thus far, and we are ready to move them into our chicken/guinea hen coop.
    We only have 1 GH left (male), and the only time he goes in the coop is at night, otherwise he is free range which is what we plan to do the our new chicks when they are old enough.
    The chicks will be moved to the brooder in the coop with a heat lamp still for cooler nights........
    My questions are:
    Will my GH accept them when they are introduced to the main coop or will he try to kill them?
    I just want to make sure I am not making any mistakes, so any help you can offer I would greatly appreciate.
    How old should the chicks be when I let them into main coop area?
    How old should the chickens be when they can be let out free range?

    Thanks so much.



    Update***************


    We moved the chicks into the coop into the brooder away from the GH last night. The GH went in to inspect the coop an was pretty loud about letting us know that there were visitors in there. [​IMG]
    When we got home last night to lock him up, he was perched and the chicks we all sleeping. [​IMG]
    Haven't checked them out this morning yet.

    We made a fenced in area for the chicks to use that will keep them safe from preds and the GH for a while too, while he roams, they will be penned in for now, until they are older.
    Fingers crossed..
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2008
  2. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    You'll probably get varying answers.

    Every bird is different so keep a close eye on your boy. He may ignore the babies or see them as a threat and attack. Especially at roost time birds seem to get kind of mean.

    As for free range. Depends on your area and personal preference. I've started as early as a few weeks old free ranging without mother hen (day olds with mother hen) and with the threat of adults that loom from a different area of the yard. I've not had a problem but I have lots and lots of space for them to roam with the only fences keeping them out of the garden. Plus with few preds, I don't worry. But if you have threats to the birds, might have to wait till they are adults. This one is on your best judgement as only you know what you have in your and what feels right. Ask 5 people get 8 different opinions.

    Best of luck!
     
  3. can you hear me now?

    can you hear me now? Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 18, 2008
    Southwest Missouri
    Here is an idea I have been having since it is so hard to care for so many chicks at once. I am going to let my little girls and guys into my coop with a box that only they can get into for safety and also be a place in there for them to get their feed and water in peace from the older girls and guy. If that made any sense i hope it helped, If not sorry i will try to elaborate better.
     
  4. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    That idea would work. Do place the entrance to the sanctuary in a strategic location near a corner of a wall though. When chicks panic, they will run anywhere to get away, not necessarily the "best" place.
     
  5. hawtchick

    hawtchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    119
    Jun 11, 2008
    New Hampshire
    can you hear me now? :

    Here is an idea I have been having since it is so hard to care for so many chicks at once. I am going to let my little girls and guys into my coop with a box that only they can get into for safety and also be a place in there for them to get their feed and water in peace from the older girls and guy. If that made any sense i hope it helped, If not sorry i will try to elaborate better.

    That made sense........ The chicks are in a brooder, within the coop, so they are safe in that manner.
    Thanks​
     

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