Mr. Bossy needs a new home In Indianapolis area

Discussion in 'Animals In Need of Free Re-Homing' started by Stamper727, Sep 1, 2014.

  1. Stamper727

    Stamper727 New Egg

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    Last edited: Sep 2, 2014
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    If he's rough on hens and human-aggressive, he will likely breed that on. To put this in perspective... You're getting rid of him to preserve your hens and yourself, but you'd prefer he go on to abuse other hens and attack other people because he's 'pretty'?

    There are other roosters who are also pretty but very kind to hens and non aggressive to people.

    If your bully finds a home, that's one home that won't have room for a good rooster instead, and one good rooster somewhere which will die for want of a home, and one flock that's going to suffer as they pass on his nasty genetics, to go and plague other families and flocks in turn. He came about because someone bred a nasty rooster, probably a whole long line of them, probably also because they're 'pretty'. He's human aggressive and that's the sort of rooster who maims humans and can kill toddlers, as well as the very hens he's supposed to be looking after.

    I commend you for doing the right and responsible thing by your hens and your family by getting rid of him, but the best case scenario really is that he does not breed. Sorry.

    Best wishes, though. I know it can be hard to consign an animal to such a fate. Helps to think of the others they'll harm if you don't; it's important to prioritize the victim's lives and happiness at least as much as his, in fact more so because he's vicious.

    Edit: oh, and [​IMG], sorry for my wet-blanket welcome. :/ Aggressive roosters are serious threats, not to be underestimated.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2014
  3. lovemy6hens

    lovemy6hens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree with chooks4life.

    We took our rooster to our dog's vet to be euthanized. If you have other animals, your vet may be willing to help or at least recommend another vet who will. We didn't want to end up with a dead hen, then still have to kill the rooster. This was the best option for us, but every situation is different.
     
  4. Stamper727

    Stamper727 New Egg

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  5. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Hmm, guessing I've offended you. I apologize. It wasn't my intention, though I probably spoke a bit too straightforwardly. They are quite dangerous animals but your attachment to him and desire to avoid destruction of life is very understandable.

    Wish you all the best.
     
  6. chickchoon1

    chickchoon1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Agreed, chooks4life. I am saddened to see all of the roos on here with people wanting them to "go to a good home". Its become a nightmare just like dogs,cats,etc not getting spayed and neutered and people thinking all of the offspring will go to a "good" home. And I used to feel similar to Stamper727 in not wanting my chickens killed but after a year of chicken ownership(am 12 rs in now) I learned its way kinder to slaughter quickly any of the "misfit" fowl.And during their stay with me they are treated extremely well.Good luck Stamper727.
     
  7. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    It's pretty normal to start out with a strict no-cull policy but a few years in I don't know anyone who keeps that rule. A harsh part of animal husbandry is that if you keep them and breed them, you also need to responsibly regulate the genetics and mentalities etc that are being passed on, and of a necessity that does involve killing some.

    Hello chickchoon1, and [​IMG]
     

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