Muddy run! Help please!

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by lancasterflock, Oct 28, 2015.

  1. lancasterflock

    lancasterflock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Here in southern Oregon it has been rainy for the last few weeks on and off. My run is sooooo muddy. I actually slipped once! Anyhow, what is the most practical cost efficient way to fix this problem during these rainy months?

    In the spring hubby and I plan on building a fully covered run. At this moment in time the expenses are not feasible. Suggestions!?
     
  2. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm not sure how long-term this would work, but when my run gets muddy (not often), I put down hay in the run. It keeps the birds off the wet ground and helps prevent slipping. The birds also like scratching around in it.
     
  3. lancasterflock

    lancasterflock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks wyandottes! I laid some straw down and quickly realized that was not going to work as it didn't absorb very well and started to mold. I ended up removing ALL the straw....boy was it heavy!!!! It had to have held some moisture because it was heavy to haul out.
     
  4. ChicksAre4Kids

    ChicksAre4Kids Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've used old planks and cinder blocks for this.
     
  5. huntingmomma3

    huntingmomma3 Just Hatched

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    We also have this issue. We are trying to keep them dry while finishing up the new coop so they have more indoor room. Any further advice would be appreciated
     
  6. TalkALittle

    TalkALittle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pallets. Any will do, but if you're lucky enough to find the ones with boards all the way across (as opposed to the ones with spaces between the boards) even better. Just make sure you remove or hammer in any nails so the birds don't get foot injuries.
     
  7. Vermont Girls

    Vermont Girls New Egg

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    a friend of mine has bought sand and placed a layer in the run and also in the coop to help with moisture and heat. she said it works great. we are trying it out this winter-will let you know how it works.
     
  8. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict


    When creating a bird habitat, think of where the wild fowl live....in the forest. Recreate that floor and you'll start to see and smell a huge difference in where your chickens live and they will be healthier and more content. Leaves, twigs, bark, small amounts of straw or hay~small, mind you, pine needles and cones, wood chips, etc. As deep as you can build it. No more mud, no more bad smells or flies. The litter pack acts like a big sponge, wicking moisture down, leaving the top springy and dryer. It keeps the soil under the run from becoming too compacted, thus allowing the rains to take the excess nitrogen of the manure down to the worms that will ascend under the litter for that nutrition. Try to avoid too much of any one material unless it would be leaves...that's mostly what you will find decaying on the forest floor. A lot of people want to use wood shavings but they are expensive and all one particle size, not letting air into the pile. Wood chips would be a better option than shavings, if you can get them as they have varying particle size and contain leaf matter.

    You create food, activity and healthier footing for your chickens in one, cheap, easy to maintain move. You can then throw lawn clippings, garden refuse, kitchen scraps, weeds, etc. into that litter pack and what the chickens don't eat they will bury and the worms will consume it. They will be living on a living compost pile instead of a slick, muddy, poopy moonscape filled with little pools of putrid water.

    And you can do the same thing in your coop:
     
  9. TalkALittle

    TalkALittle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I completely agree with Bee on this one. I suggested pallets, but only as a temporary measure. Given your location, you're probably going to be dealing with these conditions each year. I'm in New England so I'm thinking my early spring is somewhat similar to your winter with regards to rain. I had drainage problems that created a wet, stinky run despite it being covered. I made the switch from sand to deep litter and haven't looked back.
     
    paintedChix likes this.
  10. TillyPeeps

    TillyPeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My township recycle center has free mulch available October - November every year. You may also get free mulch from landscape companies. As Beekissed mentioned, you can also add leaves, grasses, weeds, etc. to your run too. All these are free and will compost well.
     

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