1. birdfolkowner

    birdfolkowner New Egg

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    I currently have both chickens and ducks. I have a section behind my backyard where their run is. The problem is that they have eaten all of the grass out of their run, now with it raining and snowing randomly it has gotten extremely muddy. I don't be know what I can do to make it not muddy all the time. Does anyone have any tips or tricks that worked for them?
     
  2. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
  3. Mahlzeit

    Mahlzeit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I keep my coop filled with dead leaves. It keeps them off the dirt/mud and allows the rain to seep down underneath but keeps it from becoming a mud pit. It also keeps the chickens more active and busy so boredom is not an issue. When you throw scratch or treats down the need to dig around in the leaves to find the scraps.
     
  4. FarmerMac

    FarmerMac Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If the soil does not allow for good drainage, it will be moddy even if you put leaves, straw or other material.
     
  5. Mahlzeit

    Mahlzeit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Not necessarily. My run was always gross and muddy during any rain that water seemed to just sit there. I now have a thick enough layer of leaves and such things that it is not longer an issue during wet weather.
     
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  6. lynnehd

    lynnehd Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes. Mine would be packed wet mud.
    But I've got at least 3-4 inches of wood chips and leaves on it, and it dries quickly after a rain. The chickens love scratching around for bugs.
     
  7. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is a mulched in area I have in the garden. Covered with several inches of old grass hay. Grass hay, with long stems drains better and lasts longer than it would with legumes like alfalfa, clover, etc. Those would work, but would rot down much faster.

    Hay (or similar coarse mulch), elevates the birds up off the ground, offers the droppings and water a place to go. Works more or less like a thick disposable diaper.

    With these systems, the grass or other coarse mulch is the C (carbon) in the compost system. The N or nitrogen comes from the birds in the form of droppings and then all you need is the water and air to set the thing in motion.

    What this are will eventually become is a super rich garden area.

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  8. Mahlzeit

    Mahlzeit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Are you talking thick wood chips like from a tree company?
     
  9. lynnehd

    lynnehd Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes. I asked the company that we've used in the past if they could dump the chips, the next time they were in our area.

    They mostly deal with fir, pine, birch, etc., in our area (rarely cedar, which we wouldn't want, of course).

    A few weeks later, they did, and I've got the extra piled up; and add about 3 wheelbarrows now and then.
    (we did tip the company).

    There is a service called chipdrop.com, which connects tree companies with residents who need chips. Not sure if it is in your area.
    Some yard supply companies sell a product called 'hog fuel', which I've seen some BYC members use.
     
  10. Mahlzeit

    Mahlzeit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You put them as a base on top of the dirt and under the leaves? I can't imagine it breaks down quickly. The chickens have no issues scratching it around?
     

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