1. mpmb1227

    mpmb1227 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 28, 2015
    Stanwood, Washington
    Hi all. I have been a chicken owner for over two years now, and I am well aware of the consequences of a muddy run. My run is about 7.5 feet wide by roughly 35 feet long. Its wedged between a carport and a shed, with about 20 feet or so, extending beyond the space between the two. I have a tarp that covers a good section between the shed and carport, but it doesn't do the best job at keeping it dry. The majority of the run gets muddy when it rains (which is a lot here in the Pacific NW) but there is a patch about 7x7 that stays dry (this is where the feeder and waterer is). I hope that wasn't too confusing. Anyway, without telling me that I need to reinforce the "roof" to maintain more dry ground, what are your opinions on the dry to wet ratio in their run? Should I be concerned or is it nothing to worry about too much since they do have a place to hang out without getting their feet all muddy. They do typically have some mud on their feet almost all the time, but when it gets too bad they don't leave the dry spot often.
     
  2. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    Actually, improving the roof would be my last suggestion as a lot of the issue you will experience comes not from water from above and a better roof will only do so much to prevent the mud. Do the structures to either side of the run sit higher or even with the ground of the run? Is there drainage/guttering on those two structures and, if so, where do they dump out - if not do the roooves slope in a way that the water falling on them runs off into the run area?
    One approach that can work well in this climate is to replicate a forest floor - layers of "green" materiel such as leaf litter, yard clippings, bark, mulch, peat moss, etc. Another approach would be to create a better drainage field by creating layers of progressively smaller rock (largest being the bottom most layer) topped by run footing of your choice. Many folks like to use sand as the run footing - if you think about walking along the lovely OR/WA coast you know that even where the waves have just receded the sand left behind is soaking wet but not "muddy" - it is a solid footing you can walk on with no issues. This is why sand is also a popular choice for arena footing for working horses, etc. As you can see, several options that have nothing to do with needing to beef up the roof situation - which would be the best choice for you and your flock will depend on what materiels you have readily available, what budget you have to obtain materiel you may not already have, etc.
     
  3. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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  4. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    Other than having used the wrong color that is pretty much what I described?
     
  5. snow5164

    snow5164 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 16, 2015
    Canada
    Hello ,
    My run is 40 feet long and 15 feet wide, we put a roof over the first 10 foot section . It is enough for my 11-15 birds to eat/ drink and be merry even in the rain . For our very rare snowy season [​IMG], we put 2x4s across the open end and stapled thick plastic , just to stop the wind ,
    You have a 7x7 dry section, sounds good to me [​IMG]You could add some sand just to help it dry out ....
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2017
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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