Muscovy Duck Advice...

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by WonderBolt, Sep 15, 2014.

  1. WonderBolt

    WonderBolt Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 13, 2014
    Ok so an hour or so ago I posted a thread about Silver Appleyards as a starter duck, well I went to buy a duck house off someone this evening and they happen to breed Muscovies, and I ended up agreeing to have two young females!

    As I said in previous thread, I am a total duck beginner so any advice no matter how small will be greatly received.

    Many thanks
     
  2. Oscarsgravett

    Oscarsgravett Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 18, 2014
    East Sussex , England
    First of all I would like to say :welcome. I have had this breed before in the past and here are so advice and info I have got :) in my experience:

    1. Muscovites are large birds and do require larger housing than many other duck breeds.

    2. They are seasonal layers but do lay large batches in quick succession .

    3. In my experience have made fantastic mothers.

    4. They are very good at feeding on aquatic plants.

    5. They like to roost which is quite strange for a duck, I don't mean give them roosting bars but many like nothing more than to perch on low roofs or branches.

    6. Their feathers aren't as water proof as some breeds so shelter in the rain available is advised.

    7. They make excellent swimmers and we had a job to get them in at night because of this.

    8. They also are excellent divers continuously we watched ours go under one end of our pond and come out the other ( bearing in mind our pond is about 7-8m long!! )

    Hopes this helps anymore questions I would be happy to answer (as long as I know the answer of course) :)
     
  3. WonderBolt

    WonderBolt Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 13, 2014
    Thank you for the advice, I'm a bit worried now. The breeder knew our cage was for them to live in (obviously they will get to free range when they've settled a bit) but now I'm worried it's too small!

    It's a run with a raised hut, it's 3ft wide, 6ft long and the run is 3ft high, the bit with the house is 5ft. I don't want them to be cramped up :(
     
  4. WonderBolt

    WonderBolt Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 13, 2014
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Buck Oakes

    Buck Oakes Chillin' With My Peeps

    I would advise not to clip there wings , they are a big part if tere lifestyle :)
     
  6. WonderBolt

    WonderBolt Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 13, 2014
    The problem is we live in terraced houses and the gardens are seperated by 3ft high fences, and I'm sure the neihbours wont want them jumping into their garden... I'm starting to think this is a mistake. I'd love them but I really don't want to compromise their care in anyway.
     
  7. Buck Oakes

    Buck Oakes Chillin' With My Peeps

    i mean like they usually stay in one pace, do you have predators where you live
     
  8. WonderBolt

    WonderBolt Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 13, 2014
    Not really, we're lucky in the UK that most of our 'predators' wouldn't take on a larger duck, but they'd be in a secure pen at night. The neighbours have two cats but they're not particularly good hunters, my rabbits and guinea pigs have lived happily in the garden with no disturbances, because it's quite a built up area animals like foxes don't really hang around long enough to dig into things but we'd make sure they couldn't dig through anyway.
     
  9. Buck Oakes

    Buck Oakes Chillin' With My Peeps

    oh I'm sorry then you can clip they're wings, its totally fine if they're in a pretty much safe all the time area. i was thinking you would like free range them and stuff like most people do, but yes theyre great indoor pets also ( if they have a diaper) and they love just coming up to you and cooing. so i guess you can clip they're wings since like you have a good little area for them
     
  10. Buck Oakes

    Buck Oakes Chillin' With My Peeps

    Also :welcome:
     

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