Muscovy duck color question

Discussion in 'Exhibition, Genetics, & Breeding to the SOP' started by the cluck juggler, Jul 15, 2019.

  1. the cluck juggler

    the cluck juggler Incubator Addict

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    I have a white drakelett. He's not fully feathered yet and completely white, no cap.

    His parents are mother and son:
    Mother - black/white magpie
    Her mother- Black. Her father - white.

    Father -blue/white magpie.
    His mother - the duck above. His father - silver

    I know the blue is dominant, but I'm unsure how it works against whole white. Does this white drake have the dominant blue gene?
    If I breed him to a black female, will his offspring be black or blue (with white)?
     
  2. Rhodeislandsilkie

    Rhodeislandsilkie Songster

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    Pictures of the Drake would help.
     
  3. the cluck juggler

    the cluck juggler Incubator Addict

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    It's white. ;) (don't have any pic's right now...)

    I was thinking about how the general genetic works. How is the black/blue gene connected to whole white? Does the whole white drake have a hidden dominant blue gene?

    Mother has 2 black parents (her white father had a black cap before molting) and dad has 1 blue and 1 black parent.
     
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  4. the cluck juggler

    the cluck juggler Incubator Addict

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    Here's one. (I think it's a girl but gender doesn't matter as I have more exactly like her.)

    As you can see, no colored cap of any kind. What does that mean for any blue/black genes?
    DSC_0010_mod.jpg

    @Rhodeislandsilkie ?
    @learycow could you help, please?
     
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  5. learycow

    learycow Crowing

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    White can mask other colors yes
     
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  6. Rhodeislandsilkie

    Rhodeislandsilkie Songster

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    I’m not sure about the genes but I can try to get some more experienced members to this forum
     
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  7. the cluck juggler

    the cluck juggler Incubator Addict

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    Thank you! So most likely he has the dominant blue gene. The only way to know is to make some babies when he's old enough, I guess.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2019
  8. The Moonshiner

    The Moonshiner Professional Chicken Tender

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    I'm no duck genetics expert but I do raise muscovies and this is how it has seemed to work for me.
    White really has nothing to do with black or blue except it covers it. So yes a white muscovy will have color underneath. I haven't found blue to be dominate over black. When I've bred the two I get offspring of both colors so just because one parent is blue doesn't mean all offspring will be blue.
    As for the white if offspring gets a copy from each parent they will be white. If they only get one copy from one parent then they end up half white which is what you're calling magpie.
    A completely white duck will produce all magpie offspring when bred to a solid color. 1/2 magpie and 1/2 white when bred to a magpie.
    If you bred a magpie blue with a magpie black and produced a white you won't know whether it carries black or blue underneath.
     
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  9. the cluck juggler

    the cluck juggler Incubator Addict

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    Thank you!
    I've found blue to be dominant since breeding silver (2 diluted blue genes) to black gives all dark blue offspring, BLUE/BLUE to black/black. But breeding dark blue to black should give 50/50 as the dark color of blue only has one diluted gene so BLUE/black to black/black.
    So you're right, this guy should either be BLUE/black or black/black and he will produce some black offspring either way. Nice to know he'll make all magpie offspring, that's what I want! :D

    Apparently there's two ways they can be solid white, heterozygotus white that'll have the dark cap when they're young and homozygotus like this one with no cap. Both will be solid white as adults. So this'll be a homozygotus white from two magpie parents with two different colors... Genetics, it's so complicated! :barnie
     
  10. learycow

    learycow Crowing

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    Not quite. Magpie is NOT the same thing as pied. Magpie is a separate gene all-together. You cannot produce magpie unless they get a copy of the gene from each parent
     
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