Muscovy mules???

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by farmdude, Sep 23, 2011.

  1. farmdude

    farmdude Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When you cross a donkey jack with a horse mare, you get a mule. When you cross a Stallion horse with a donkey jenny, you get a hinny. A very small percent are fertile. Like 1 in a 1,000. Are there any cases of Muscovie X duck crosses being fertile? Or are they always "mules".
     
  2. ian4379

    ian4379 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    females are all infertile but i have seen a khaki cambell crossed muscovy drake that was fertile and have read that a very small percentage of muscovy cross drakes are fertile. it'd be a nightmare testing the theory though!
     
  3. ChickieBooBoo

    ChickieBooBoo Cold Canadian Chick

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    Is it quite rare, but can happen.
     
  4. Bleenie

    Bleenie Wyan-DO's

    teeny buit off topic but... I remember reading somewhere that only the hinnys lay eggs.... and now i cannot remember which way you have to breed to get hinnys [​IMG] (i think muscovy hen though)
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2011
  5. farmdude

    farmdude Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've also read that some chicken breeds when crossed with ring neck pheasant can produce fertile some off spring. I think it was pheasant roo over game hens.
     
  6. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    There are two different types of Moulard (Muscovy X Mallard derivative).

    The one primarily raised for meat is Male Muscovy X Female Pekin. The hybrid offspring from this are generally called the mules. Males and females grow to almost the same size because the females don't have the genetic/hormonal "growth brakes" of the female Muscovy (contained on the W chromosome, which they get from mom...in this case, a Pekin mom).

    The "hinny" cross goes the other way -- Male Mallard derivative X Female Muscovy. The hybrid females are able to lay, but the eggs are usually (almost) completely yolk-less, and thus they are sterile. They get their W chromosome from their Muscovy moms, which also contains the "brakes" that keeps them from getting as big as their brothers, so in this cross, the females stay small and lay small eggs that can be eaten, but won't ever be fertile.

    In evolutionary biology, there is a trend called Haldane's Rule (or Law) with regard to hybrids between different species. Basically, when two different species interbreed, the offspring with different sex chromosomes will be sterile before the offspring with paired sex chromosomes. In birds, females have different sex chromosomes (ZW, and males are ZZ). In mammals, it's the other way around (females are XX, males are XY). So when there is reduced fertility in hybrid birds, it's the females that will be sterile, and the males may be partially fertile. In mammals, the males will be sterile and the females may be partially fertile. When you read of rare cases of mules or hinnies being fertile, they were females. The rare times that a liger or tigon reproduces, it's always the female. In creating the Bengal breed of cat, male hybrid offspring between domestic cats and leopard cats are sterile until the third or fourth generation, but females can be bred. With birds, a familiar example is the red canary, created by crossing canaries with Venezuelan red siskins. Female hybrids are sterile, but some males are fertile. Breeding these males back to canaries is how the genes for red feathers were introduced. There are different proposed explanations for how and why this is, but the trend of hybrid sterility (if it exists...not all hybrids between different species are sterile...many are completely fertile) follows this pattern.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2011
  7. jm93030

    jm93030 Chillin' With My Peeps

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  8. JulieNKC

    JulieNKC Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:Great information, thanks!
     
  9. farmdude

    farmdude Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is the best way I have ever heard it explained. Thank you!
    Quote:
     
  10. farmdude

    farmdude Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Very cool link! Thanks for sharing!
    Quote:
     

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