Muscovy Questions

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by huckleberrypres, Mar 8, 2016.

  1. huckleberrypres

    huckleberrypres Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 16, 2016
    Davenport, WA
    I've read a bunch of threads and googled...still unclear on some things.

    Some of those things have to do with the mixed flock our mixed flock.

    When I collected these Muscovies last fall I was getting "ducks." I didn't know they were "Muscovy" nor did I know they were going to end up being huge, mostly mellow, friendly and dramatic looking.

    Now we have Muscovy, mallards and a rouen duck...23 in total. A couple drakes are destined to be cooked soon.

    re: eggs

    Our primary interest is eggs.

    I gather Muscovies aren't the best for eggs. I read different numbers for what they produce each year. is it more like 70 or more like 180? A couple of the ladies have begun laying. I already notice they pine for their eggs. They are clearly thinking about brooding. Is it okay to take their eggs like we do from the mallards or will they get upset and stop laying...?

    re: genetics

    If I had to do it all over again I would have picked a single breed (not Muscovy) and stuck with that single breed. I don't want to keep separate flocks. I don't really want to "breed" ducks so much. But now I have this moulard/mule situation with the Muscovies/mallard derivatives. If I let any of the ducks brood out now, I'm likely to end up with little mule ducklings, right? So my flock is genetic mud. I feel bad about it. I'd love to hear people's thoughts and experiences on this. Do I just let it go and do the best I can over time? I did want to hatch the occasional nest, but now I'm not sure I should. plus I want the eggs.

    Our ducks live in duck heaven. Now that we have Muscovies, we love them, think they are fun and beautiful, have made special friends with several of them. Most of them will live out their natural lives in the lap of luxury.

    Hungry to learn and hungry for eggs. :)

    Thanks!
     
  2. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    I don't know if she's around much but @Going Quackers has Muscovies and mallard-derived ducks.
     
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  3. caesargirl

    caesargirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    @miss lydia
     
  4. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Muscovy's are a wonderful breed of duck they are seasonal layers like your Mallards so for year round eggs you'll be relying on your Rouen and she may slow down over coldest months. As for eggs i have 6 females and get plenty of eggs they do love to brood though so if you don't want mixed breeds you'll have to take the eggs daily. Mine will continue to brood even if they aren't sitting on an egg. They really are obsessed with it. If your looking for a good meat bird I understand mixing the Muscovy with another breed is a good meat bird. I don't eat mine. Also Mules can lay eggs they just won't hatch being sterile.
    I practice birth control here or I'd be over run with Muscovy's although I love them dearly I can only have so many so for me right now 6 female and 1 drake is a plenty along with the other birds I have. I have actually thought of introducing another breed into my Muscovy flock just to get mules that way I'd not have to worry about collecting eggs to keep them from hatching eventually.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2016
  5. macgro7

    macgro7 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Muscovies will lay a clutch of maybe a dozen eggs (sometimes more) and most likely go broody. They might do it two or maybe even three times a year but that it. You are unlikely to get more eggs from a Muscovy. Why don't you ear their eggs and give them rouen eggs to sit on? That way you are hatching a pure breed
     
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  6. huckleberrypres

    huckleberrypres Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 16, 2016
    Davenport, WA
    since this last post I've grown to appreciate Sarah, the rouen, even more. She talks cute, is happy to be flocking with the baby mallards, and is indeed, laying beautiful xl eggs every day. It's a good idea having the muscovy ladies hatch some rouen ducklings for us. I'm maxed on birds, but over time it's going to happen. I'd like Sarah to have some of her own to be with.

    Now that we are further along in the game I'm noticing the ducks are mostly sticking to their own kind. I haven't seen the little mallard male try to breed anybody other than his lady for weeks now. I was maybe getting uptight for no good reason...?

    We are getting 6 eggs a day now. We've collected a couple enormous eggs so far, I assume those are from the muscovies, who seem to be laying consistently extra large eggs every day. So I am encouraged. We are building a straw bale home from them. Guessing when they get settled into their forever homes and nesting spots production will go up.

    it's a joy being able to provide these animals a happy, save home. thanks for the input!
     
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  7. huckleberrypres

    huckleberrypres Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 16, 2016
    Davenport, WA
    advancing through the year....we now have about 30 some odd ducks. and counting. I am very busy with my business and family medical concerns. I don't get on here much. The ducks are almost my only form of entertainment and only hobby. thank goodness for duckies.

    We moved a muscovy mom and her nest today. She was at the end of the property in some bushes, kind of where we already lost a previous mom and her nest to some predator. Question is: now that we've moved her, will she go back on her nest and sit? She has about 15 eggs, very well lined with down. We moved the down as well. Put all the eggs and mom in a (large & comfy) cage with her eggs. She has covered them up but is not sitting on them yet. Will she go back to sitting on her nest? any guesses?

    Thanks!
     

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