musty conditions

cyan23

In the Brooder
May 16, 2015
14
0
22
Paw Paw Mi
Hello all. My wife and I are new to chickens. We have 7 isa brown chicks and are needing to get a coop up. We have a back section of our garage that would be an ideal space with lots of room and is connected to the run we have set up. The only problem is it is a bit musty. I am wondering the effects it would have on our girls. We plan to use them for eggs only at this point. Any knowledge on the effects of musty conditions to bird health or egg production would be much appreciated.
 

Ol Grey Mare

One egg shy of a full carton. .....
7 Years
Mar 9, 2014
20,622
15,042
821
Oregon
My Coop
My Coop
Welcome to BYC!

As mentioned above, "musty" is generally an issue with an area that is lacking in ventilation. Ventilation is key in maintaining healthy birds and would need to be added during the re-model/conversion of the area into a coop for your birds, so that would likely serve to address the mustiness. Perhaps you can describe your plans in a bit more detail so we can better envision what you are proposing and answer as to how that might suit chickens.
 

Cknldy

Songster
7 Years
Nov 6, 2012
1,489
110
158
Appalachian mtns
Musty smells in a home (or garage) sometimes mean mold issues. Might want to get that checked for your health as well as any pets. If you're like many of us on BYC you've read through some of the coop problems that come up- ventilation is a huge one. Chickens in an enclosed space (even with a nice sized run outdoors) are going to make a mess with natural occurrences such as poop, feathers being preened, moltong (later), dustbathing and just being chickens in general
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Every day maintenance/ husbandry is essential in an indoors environment. I'd highly suggest an outdoor setup even if it has to be temporary. If you're talking chicks well now that's different! Still daily maintenance but after feathering out they can go outdoors. Those few weeks can give you time to get a coop built. Definitely try to find out why the area is musty for your own health too. Chicks especially need lots of ventilation. Hope you find what you need here on BYC and welcome to the chicken madness!
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cyan23

In the Brooder
May 16, 2015
14
0
22
Paw Paw Mi
Thanks for the quick replies. The back room is separated from main part of garage, it looks like it was maybe where they stored canned food. It is built into a hill, there was no gutter and had some water damage to back wall. Solved the problem from getting worse but replacing the wood would be a big project likely. So as for the setup. There are three shelves oh about 12 to 14 feet long. I was looking at taking out the middle shelf and boxing in the area. I envisioned windows with some sort of chicken mesh to the main part of garage and likely one to the run. So the coop itself would be closed off from the musty are but still in the environment. Let me state it is not a must that we go this route, it just seemed long term a better option because more chickens and other livestock likely follow!
 

Mochadlik

In the Brooder
5 Years
Sep 27, 2014
22
5
31
Albany Oregon
I live in the Pacific Northwest so 7 months of a year there is a general dampness that is unavoidable. I agree with other posters that good ventilation is the key. My chickens are thriving, they free range even when it is raining. I guess I would be a bit more concerned with very young ones, but older juveniles and up I would not worry.if you vent to the main part of your garage you will have chicken smell and dust forever. I would recommend just venting to the outdoors.
 

Ol Grey Mare

One egg shy of a full carton. .....
7 Years
Mar 9, 2014
20,622
15,042
821
Oregon
My Coop
My Coop
One thing to consider about venting the coop into your main garage with that window plan is that chickens are a dusty animal - is that something that is going to bother you with regards to the rest of your garage?
 

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