My 2 girls haven't laid in a month

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by ThelmaOrLouise, Jan 2, 2017.

  1. ThelmaOrLouise

    ThelmaOrLouise Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a 2 year old Americana and an 18 month old Leghorn. The Americana got broody at the end of August and after breaking her she molted. She started laying for a few weeks but stopped. My leghorn molted in November. Neither girls have laid an egg since mid November at least. They seem healthy and are acting normal. I've increased their protein. Our days are short of course here in South Carolina with it being winter. Anything else I can do? I don't really have a way to run a light out to the coop.
     
  2. ChickenGrass

    ChickenGrass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi there.
    Chickens will stop laying because of shorter light hours in winter.
    Some people put artificial light in the coops so the hens will stay laying.
    I have gotten very little eggs from my breeding hens.
    I have 5 different breeds (around 40 hens) and all together I would say I got less than 30 eggs from November to December.
    Don't worry as the hens should be starting to lay soon.
    Goodluck,
    Fionn.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2017
  3. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Days are now getting longer(infinitesimally) each day....hopefully they will start laying again soon.
    Not much you can do but wait.
     
  4. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

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    Once they have replaced their feathers, they have to get their body weight back up before they can resume laying. All you can do is be patient. As aart said, the days are getting longer again, so that will help increase production.
     
  5. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Let It Snow Premium Member

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    My younger hens are picking up production now under increasing daylight, and some of my older hens are beginning to vocalize more and their combs are getting more red. The older girls should begin laying again within the next month or two.
     
  6. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    It's totally normal for their age. After molting, they usually take the winter off to rest and recharge. Egg production isn't a year round, year after year thing, it's cyclic. They'll start back up as the days are getting longer. You should have eggs by Easter at the latest.
     
  7. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    Just a side note, and not relevant to the OP's question, but I thought some may be interested: On the equator, where there is no change in daylight hours throughout the year, egg production is a year round, year after year thing. It sure shortens the useful lifespan of a laying bird but those with a tendency to go broody seem to last a little longer.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Thanks Ken, I didn't think of that. I'm so used to being a Northern Hemisphere girl, never thought about the longer daylight hours effecting hens like that.

    How does that work for molting? Is it more age based? They've still got to molt sometime......
     
  9. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Let It Snow Premium Member

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    That's really interesting. So cool I get to learn stuff like that from people like you. I never would have guessed. Chicken keeping is different based on where people live I am finding out. Thank you.
     
  10. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    There's no discernible molting period - I can only assume its a constant but gradual, year round thing (i.e. you don't actually see feather loss). I've had 3 year old chickens that have never been through a "conventional" molt. I've often wondered about that myself. Maybe not having any temperature / daylight fluctuations to speak of, fails to trigger a molt[​IMG]

    I'm glad that you both took my post in the spirit in which it is meant - just to share how things can differ across the world. If i ever return to the UK and keep chickens, at least I have a "heads up" as to what to expect from the you guys here at BYC [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2017
    1 person likes this.

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