My 8-month-old Australorp pullet is shreiking

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by chickcritty, Nov 5, 2009.

  1. chickcritty

    chickcritty Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 28, 2009
    Eugene, Oregon
    I recently noticed her doing this at bedtime because my other Australorp tries to get underneath her on the roost to get away from the Orps that pick on her. But now she will be out free-ranging in the yard and will do it then. It sounds alot like the noise a broody makes when disturbed on her nest. I just can't figure out why she does it while walking around the yard. None of the other chickens are bugging her when she does it. Has anyone else experienced this? She is healthy, I'm just kind of wondering about this because it's a new behaviour for her.
     
  2. CheerfulHeart2

    CheerfulHeart2 Creative Problem Solver

    Apr 8, 2009
    Phoenix, AZ
    odd.
     
  3. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

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    Not the egg song?
     
  4. digitS'

    digitS' Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm not quite sure what is going on, Chickcritty, but I've been around broody hens enuf to know that they are "wired differently" than normal.

    Chickens, as critters go, must be fairly simple. They aren't using much thought process or probably not a whole lot of learning to get thru each day. I mean, what kind of knowledge base can a bird build when they grow to full maturity in half a year and have a brain the size of a peanut?

    They, like many animals (and quite a few humans) mostly react to the world around them. In a chicken's case, I suspect the reactions are primarily based on hormones.

    Light, food, and the actions of the flock around them - all affect the hormones released into their bloodstream. Think about it - we humans will react to stimulus that is perceived as threatening by almost an instantaneous release of adrenalin into our blood. Probably every body cell responds to that hormone. It seems likely to me, that a chicken would be even more quickly and frequently influenced by the hormones released by its endocrine system.

    In other words, I think she's just "all hormonal" and that's about it. Give her a little time, and she will probably get over it.

    Steve
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2009
  5. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

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    digitS' :

    I think she's just "all hormonal" and that's about it. Give her a little time, and she will probably get over it.

    That pretty much sums up the female sex. [​IMG]
     
  6. Whispering Winds

    Whispering Winds Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:That pretty much sums up the female sex. [​IMG]

    Hey! Careful there!!! [​IMG]
     
  7. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

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    Quote:That pretty much sums up the female sex. [​IMG]

    Hey! Careful there!!! [​IMG]

    I'm one of them!!! [​IMG]
     
  8. CheerfulHeart2

    CheerfulHeart2 Creative Problem Solver

    Apr 8, 2009
    Phoenix, AZ
    Some of my hens "bark" sometimes. I have never figured out just why. You might want to check her over to make sure she seems ok, you know, crop, vent, feet and what not.
     
  9. chickcritty

    chickcritty Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 28, 2009
    Eugene, Oregon
    Thanks for the input everyone. I agree it's probably chicken hormones at work [​IMG] These are our first feathered pets so everything is new for us. I'm not really worried about her, I was just curious about it. We have a Buff Orp that makes a barking noise too [​IMG] They're interesting creatures and I think they're going to be lifelong pets, along with our cats and dogs.
     
  10. flakey chick

    flakey chick Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 3, 2007
    Florida
    I would say hormones and that she is finding her broody voice. Expect that she may get serious about wanting to set soon.
     

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