My 8-year old daughter's two week old chick is hobbling. Suggestons?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by avincent52, Jul 2, 2008.

  1. avincent52

    avincent52 New Egg

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    Jun 29, 2008
    My daughter brought home what's now a 2-3 week old chick named Clover from her school's egg hatching project.
    (Her name, Yolkie Berra, didn't win in the class election.)
    The chick seems generally happy and healthy, eating well, growing, attempting to fly,
    except that it's hobbling some.

    It kind of pushes its left leg out splayed to the side like a speed skater.
    The other leg stays underneath the way it should.
    But she keeps pushing on the left leg so it goes around in a little circle.

    When it's sitting or standing, the chick still keeps that left leg out to the side.

    No accident or injury or signs of any, and the chick has been alone in a cardboard box or closely supervised. It hasn't been exposed to other chickens except the other chicks while it was hatching, and hasn't been outside at all.

    I know nothing about chickens, but I looked at both legs.
    I can move both legs in a range of motion, and I can tuck the left leg back under it without any apparent pain or much protest from the chick.

    The "splayed" left leg actually seems quite a bit stronger than the right.

    Suggestions? This is my daughter's pet and within reason we're willing to do what we can to help it.

    thanks in advance,

    allen
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2008
  2. jessica117

    jessica117 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2008
    SE Tennessee
    Here is a link to a page that has pictures and step by step directions.

    http://www.poultryhelp.com/spraddle.html

    and here is another posted by a BYC member with even more detailed pics.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=20205

    I know only one leg is splayed but you'll do the same thing with it.

    Usually it only happens in younger chicks than yours. I hope that it isn't too late to fix it. I'm sure someone more experienced can answer that. I'd do it as soon as possible though.

    Jess
     
  3. avincent52

    avincent52 New Egg

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    Jun 29, 2008
    Dear Jess
    My daughter says
    "Thank you for the advice. We tried what you suggested. We put on a piece of adhesive tape, because Clover is a little bit bigger and older than the chick you showed in the picture.
    Clover was flapping around at first but then she got more used to it and she's definitely calmed down a lot. Her leg is now staying under her, but she's still a little bit wobbly.
    I am very relieved that Clover will be okay.
    Thanks again.
    Emma."

    As Emma said, it seemed to go very well and I expect that Clover will soon be walking proudly.

    best
    Allen
     
  4. jessica117

    jessica117 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2008
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    I'm very glad to hear that! [​IMG]
     
  5. avincent52

    avincent52 New Egg

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    Jun 29, 2008
    A 12-hour update.
    Clover seems to be keeping her feet under her happily while she's sitting or sleeping.
    She's standing much better, too.
    She's having a little trouble walking--she's essentially got her shoelaces tied together--but hopefully within a few days we'll be able to take the tape off and she'll be walking normally.

    Clover is closer to three-weeks old, but I'm pretty hopeful about the outcome.

    We live in a town just outside of New York City--you can see Manhattan from our bedroom window at night, but we've got four or five friends who are raising chickens, and I think all of them came from the second grade hatchery.

    Except for the raccoons, it's a pretty good place for it. And the eggs are phenomenally good.

    Thanks again for the advice and encouragement. At some level it's about the chicken, but mostly it's about Emma and it's just as well that she's not the mother of a special needs chick.
    best
    Allen
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2008
  6. jessica117

    jessica117 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2008
    SE Tennessee
    Chickens are pretty resilient. A lot can happen to them and they'll still turn out normal and healthy. I wish you the best of luck with your little fuzz butt. Welcome to the world of chicken raising!

    Jess
     

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