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My Bantam Rooster has a Bleeding Comb- Please Advise!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Elisabeth Rose, Jan 4, 2014.

  1. Elisabeth Rose

    Elisabeth Rose Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 11, 2013
    Hello,
    I have 2 hens (full-size) and a Bantam Rooster. They are all 6 mos old. They have been together since birth. I got them at the end of June. They have a small wooden coop and I put it by my back garage door with a Sunbrella tent over it for the winter. I keep them very clean and well-fed and watered. The 2 chickens have been laying one egg each nearly every day since Dec 10. I let them out free in the yard an hour or more every day if it isn't too cold and I keep an eye on them. They don't wander too far. So, they are well-loved. They stay outside all night, but when it is very cold, I put them in a dog crate in my garage with food and water. That happened last night as it has been about 0 degrees here and it is only 5 degrees right now at 11 am.
    That's the background info.
    So, I let them out this morning and all was OK. I just went out to gather the eggs and give them more water (because it freezes, I change it every couple of hours) and my little Bantam has a bleeding comb (the thing on top of his head). It even looks like one bump was bitten off. I wrapped him in a towel and brought him inside to wipe off the blood and I put fresh shavings in the crate, food, and water. He is now in there alone, but he's crowing because he hates to be apart from the girls.
    What should I do for him? Do I need to keep him separate and for how long? What happened to his comb? No evidence of a predator getting in, but it wouldn't be impossible- HELP!!! I love my little chickies.
     
  2. Elisabeth Rose

    Elisabeth Rose Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 11, 2013
    Here's a picture I just took. It is not actively bleeding, but it's still wet. I put a little cornstarch on to dry it up.[​IMG]
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I'm not an expert on frost bite but the tan area looks like earlyfrostbite. Vaseline is good to prevent frostbite many say, but with his fresh wounds I would use Neosporin or other brand of antibiotic ointment now. BluKote dab-on or spray can be used too, but it gets purple all over and is staining. As for the pecking, they may need a little larger coop or run.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2014
  4. Elisabeth Rose

    Elisabeth Rose Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 11, 2013
    OK- I wondered if it might be a little frostbite, but why did it start bleeding? Do you think the hens pecked at him? They do have an attached run that is open to them all the time with a little door. It is 8 feet x 4 feet. Should I keep them in the garage on cold days too? I want to do the right thing. Do I need to keep him separate and for how long?? Will get the antibiotic cream today. THANKS!!
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I would watch their behavior for a little while. You will probably see a hen pecking him if that is what is happening. He also could have injured it on something, or even a rat could have bitten him, but I would bet that he was pecked. The other chicken may have even noticed frostbite and pecked at it. When pecking occurs, there are anti-peck lotions available, but it's best to make sure their protein level is at least 16%, but maybe increasing it to 20% is better, giving enough room, and have some things to climb on and explore--rocks, a piece of grass-covered sod from the yard to peck, a hanging cabbage or treatball with greens inside, an so-on. Here are 2 poultry products for pecking problems:

    http://www.strombergschickens.com/p...plies?s=GSHP&gclid=CN3J2rr-5LsCFYlaMgodw2sAbA

    http://www.amazon.com/Rooster-Booster-Pick-No-More-Lotion-4oz/dp/B003Z33DGC
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2014
  6. RoostersCrow HensDeliver!

    RoostersCrow HensDeliver! Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It looks to me like that point has been bitten off. I have also had wattles crack and bleed from frostbite. Apply flour or a clotting powder to stop the bleeding.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2014
  7. Elisabeth Rose

    Elisabeth Rose Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 11, 2013
    Ok- thank you for the advice. I bought the Neosporin and I have the 2 hens free in the garage and Benny (bantam) is in the garage confined to the kennel. I bought him a can of tuna and some corn for a treat. They are on Layena food- does that have enough protein? I also give them meats, fish, beans, cheese, yogurt, seeds, veggies, etc. Just one treat per day. How long do I need to keep him separate and how can I give him a good washing- there is a tiny bit of blood in his feathers. THANKS AGAIN!!!
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Layena has 16% protein and is good, but whenever treats are give their protein level will change depending on the food. I and others use a flock raiser or all flock feed that is 20% protein, and put crushed oyster shell in a can for free feeding for calcium. That way if I have roosters, hens molting, or chicks who should not eat the extra calcium in layer feed (3% versus 1%,) they won't get it. Purina makes crumbles in this, and I get a Southern States brand called Rockin Rooster Growth Booster Pellets which has a little meat protein in it.
     
  9. Elisabeth Rose

    Elisabeth Rose Out Of The Brooder

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    Are you saying that my little rooster needs more protein than the hens??
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    No, I am saying that roosters, chicks, and hens who are molting and not laying, do not need the extra calcium that is in layer food. Also, an all flock or flock raiser will provide a higher protein level if you want to increase it to 20% because of the possible pecking. Do not go above 20 % protein in chickens. Also, an all flock/flock raiser feed is almost identical to unmedicated chick starter/grower.
     

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