My chicken coop extension - Roof type and number of chickens ? :)

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by RooChick, Oct 30, 2016.

  1. RooChick

    RooChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi everyone !

    Hubby and I have been working on our chicken coop extension.
    We bought the coop on the left and the small extension inside the larger one from a shop, but I decided I wanted to be able to walk inside with the chickens and give them some more space.
    Our extension is now 4 metres x 4 metres square and once the roof goes on, 2 metres high.
    The coop on the left is approximately 2 metres long x 1 metre wide and 1.5 metres high.

    Just wondering, does anyone have any ideas on the type of roof I should use ?
    I was thinking half solid / half wire so the chickens can still get some sunlight ?

    Also, how many chickens could I house in this size coop / run ?

    [​IMG]

    Thanks ! [​IMG]
     
  2. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Overrun With Chickens

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    I see that you are in a warm climate by the green growth in the background. You can keep easily 12 chickens in that compound, understanding that you would need to build roost bars in the covered portion of the run area. For the night. Some of your chickens would go inside the small coop. Some would roost in the small run portion of coop. Others would roost wherever they could. Would be difficult to squeeze all 12 into that existing coop in my opinion. You would need a plan to provide shelter for the chickens during bad weather/rain/winds. etc.
    What is the predator situation where you are at?
    You may consider modifying the original coop to close off the screened portion so there is more shelter area.
    I like your thought of the roof 50% solid and 50% open. For the solid, use corrugated fiberglass panels that let light thru.
    WISHING YOU BEST ... [​IMG]
     
  3. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    Space requirements (4sqft per bird in coop, 10sqft in run and 1ft per bird for roosts) exist as general guidelines. These numbers however, should be considered the minimum space provisions. It should not really be a question of what's the max one can keep in a given space (I realise that you did not ask that). If you do not intend to free range your flock, then the fewer the chickens, the less stressed and happier they will be.
     
  4. RooChick

    RooChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My location is Queensland, Australia. So it's quite warm at the moment, almost summer !

    There are two roost bars in the very back top section of the coop, but yes, closing the rest of it off and just having the new extension as the run is on the cards.

    And I was also thinking of putting some small shelters in places in case of rain / wind.

    As for predators, there are foxes and snakes. But we have miniature fox terriers and they kill any snake that they find in the yard.
    I have also heard that foxes don't like the smell of dogs and if our dogs hear noises, they always go to investigate and bark.
    So I'm hoping our dogs will keep them safe. They don't dig and have never gone after our chickens when we let them out to free range.

    On both the coop and extension, we have used snake and vermin wire mesh and have blocked off all holes bigger than 1.25 x 1.25mm (which is the size of the mesh holes). I'm hoping that if snakes which are small enough to get through this would be killed by the chickens.

    I never thought of using fiberglass panels ! I will mentions this to my husband.

    Thanks !
     
  5. RooChick

    RooChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We do free range the chickens in the afternoons and on the weekends, but only under supervision in case of hawks / eagles (forgot these ones, another predator, but no problem once we put the roof on).

    We don't want too many chickens. At the moment we have 1 x Golden Laced Wyandotte, 1 x Light Sussex, 1 x Speckled Sussex and I was thinking of getting a rescue ex-battery hen and maybe a couple more different ones. So probably 6 in total.

    When they are out and about, they have 1 acre to run around on.
     
  6. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    Based on a recent thread, please be aware ex-batts can exhibit behaviours that may negatively affect the whole flock (feather pecking, in particular). Of course, its your choice, but maybe do a little research before making that decision. But having a total of 6 I personally think is ideal for the set up that you have.

    Good luck
    CT
     
  7. RooChick

    RooChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks CT. I have done a little research on them and have read that you need to quarantine them, watch for health problems, slowly try to add them to the flock etc., but I hadn't read any negative things in regards to them feather pecking ! I will do some more research as I certainly don't want that to start up with my chickens.
     
  8. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Overrun With Chickens

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    I think a rescue battery hen is a good Idea. Let her live out her life in peace. [​IMG] The bad behavior is probably being in confinement. Once, they are in freedom and open, I think they will be grateful to you. 2 of my dogs, most of the cats, and a couple of my chickens are rescues. (got them free due to personal circumstances)
     
  9. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    Well, here you have a different experience - always good when a member contributes, based on personal experience. As @cavemanrich suggests, displacement behaviour is a result of environmental stressors, its just a question of whether those behaviours have become habitual. As long as you are aware of the potential for things not to go as you would hope, then you are one step ahead of the game.

    Best of luck
     
  10. Cbennich

    Cbennich Out Of The Brooder

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    We have half of the run under a tin roof. The other half is chicken wire. The girls get morning sun and afternoon shade. No regrets so far. We are having a bad drought now. However, the summer rains were not a problem either.
     
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