My chicken died last night

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Chiiiiiiiiiickens!, Feb 9, 2009.

  1. Chiiiiiiiiiickens!

    Chiiiiiiiiiickens! Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 26, 2008
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    Hi, My poor Floppy died last night of what I think was sour crop. She had a big, squishy crop and she had a smell of poo about her. We turned her upside down and drained a lot of liquid, but we didn't get whatever was causing the problem, so she didn't make it. I was planning on calling the vet this morning, but too late. What I'm wondering from all of you guys is what can I do to prevent the others from getting the same condition. They have straw, not hay, for bedding. They haven't been free ranging lately due to constant snow cover. Maybe they weren't getting enough grit? I was giving the oyster shell, but maybe not enough. I just bought granite grit and put some in their food last night. Also, I had gotten into the habit of frequently giving them their layer food in a moist mash form because they didn't seem to eat it when it was in pellets. Any advice would be sooo welcome.
     
  2. gumpsgirl

    gumpsgirl Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I am so sorry you lost your hen. [​IMG]

    I agree that it sounds like a sour or impacted crop and more than likely was due from the straw. This is a common thing for chickens that have been kept on straw. It doesn't happen all the time (some people keep chickens on straw without any issues), but it does happen more than one thinks. Especially where they have been kept in because of the bad weather.

    Again, I'm so sorry this happened. [​IMG]
     
  3. bargain

    bargain Love God, Hubby & farm Premium Member

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    I am so sorry. My thoughts and prayers are with you. Nancy
     
  4. sewincircle

    sewincircle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am really sorry about your loss. [​IMG] It happens though. I give my chickens things to pick at when they are stuck inside, like cabbage, so they dont get bored and eat stuff they shouldnt. Also offer grit. Again, I am really sorry.
     
  5. Chiiiiiiiiiickens!

    Chiiiiiiiiiickens! Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 26, 2008
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    Thank you all. The other girls are out roaming about, as we finally have a little snow-free patch of ground. They are so much happier! So, does anyone think making a mash of their food is a problem? Is it better to keep it in pellets?
     
  6. gumpsgirl

    gumpsgirl Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    If you're just wanting to offer something warm to them, make them a pan of oatmeal. Just plain oatmeal. That way you don't have to deal with trying to make a mash out of the pellets. It ends up being much easier.

    My chickens all go nuts when it's cold outside and I deliver them a pan of warm oatmeal. [​IMG]
     
  7. sewincircle

    sewincircle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is a great idea. I know my kids love oatmeal. I will try that.

    You made the mash because they were not liking the pellets? I dont think that caused the crop issue, but someone who knows more should answer that.
     
  8. Beau coop

    Beau coop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you don't have time to make oatmeal, a quick substitute is pellets mixed with warm water. My girls appreciate something warm on cold days too.

    So sorry about your hen.[​IMG]
     
  9. Chiiiiiiiiiickens!

    Chiiiiiiiiiickens! Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 26, 2008
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    Yes, they weren't eating the pellets much. This morning I presented them with pellets and they were not pleased. I suppose they will eat them if there is no choice. I hung up a lettuce as well. I'm so paranoid about them now! Maybe I should run out and give them softened pellets like they are used to. I'm really stressing out over this!
     
  10. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I lost a hen last year to sour crop and we cured another. They apparently both stuck their heads through some fencing that surrounds my compost pile and got into a pocket of molded feed at the bottom. The pile was usually safe, but had grown so large that it was too close to the fencing holding it in.
    If you suspect sour crop, which feels like a gassy, bloated crop and their breath smells sour from the fermenting materials, you should separate and stop all food for at least 24 hours. Give only water with ACV with mother of vinegar (sediment) in it, a couple TBSP to a gallon is okay. Then start back with active culture yogurt and soft scrambled egg in small amounts, all the while, checking the crop.
    It took my Ivy about three or four days to recover from her bout with it, but she's fine now and they cant get to that compost pile anymore. Moldy feed is probably one of the main causes and although I thought I'd taken precautions, that one snuck up on us.
     

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