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My Chickens Segregate From Each Other

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Deckgirls, Aug 25, 2014.

  1. Deckgirls

    Deckgirls Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have 4 RIR pullets and 2 (i think) Japanese bantams. The RIR stick together and the 2 bantams stick together. if the RIR are in the run the bantams stay up in the roosts of the coop. They very rarely come down and if they do they stay far away from the others. I never see fighting or anything like that, they just stay away. the RIR are about 13 weeks and the bantams are 20 weeks. Is it normal for them to "stay with their own kind"
     
  2. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    I think that is relatively normal with chickens. Were yours raised together? In general, my bantam Wyandottes stay in their own "pack" and don't intermix with my Dutch Bantams. The only exception is one Wyandotte bantam pullet who was raised alone with Dutch bantams. She sometimes is with the other Wyandottes, but she doesn't mind being with the Dutch, either.
     
  3. Deckgirls

    Deckgirls Chillin' With My Peeps

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    no they didn't "grow up" together :) we got the RIR when they were about 8 weeks old and and we got the JB when the RIR were about 11 weeks old. by then the JB were about 18 weeks old. i feel so bad because i guess the bantams are so small hahaha. they just look so left out and tiny :)
     
  4. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    They're fine. They do tend to stay with their own flocks, not necessarily their "own kind". If you had brought in two different breeds that were raised together, you'd see the same thing. My flock tends to separate by age. The younger ones hang out together, the older ones hang out together. They'll all be closely bonded by the time they've spend the winter together in the coop.
     
  5. Deckgirls

    Deckgirls Chillin' With My Peeps

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    is it normal for my bantams to always be sitting on the roosts? they rarely go out in the run. and one especially is always on the roost way up in a corner where i can barely even see her :( maybe i worry too much :) :)
     
  6. Denwendairy

    Denwendairy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Interesting! I've also noticed this 'segregation' and was hoping that it wasn't due to the way we transitioned the new pullets into the flock.
    Just over 3 weeks ago, we introduced a new group of 13 week old pullets to our original flock (also 13-14 weeks old). We started the transition with the new birds in a wire dog kennel within the run, then free ranging together but separated while in the run. The original flock definitely let them know that they were in charge but beyond a bit of feather pulling and charging, it's gone really well (no injuries!). We took the wire kennel away this weekend.
    While in the run or free ranging, they definitely stay as two separate groups. We see one of the original flock hang out with the newbies occasionally but the division is pretty distinct. Glad to read bobbi-j's comment that they're likely to bond over the winter!
    Great topic, Deckgirls!
     
  7. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    They're probably still intimidated by the bigger ones. How much room do you have for your chickens? (Dimensions of your coop and run, not just 'It's pretty big".) It could be they don't have enough space to get away when the big ones chase them, so they're staying where they feel safe. It's helpful to have something they can hide behind or under (this could be as simple as leaning a piece of plywood against the run or putting pallets up on cement blocks - maybe something low enough they can get under, but not the big girls). Two feeding and watering stations is also helpful. Or free ranging so everyone has plenty of room.
     

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