My dream of silver laced wyandotte hens...shattered! Now what?

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by WyandotteWally, Aug 28, 2016.

  1. WyandotteWally

    WyandotteWally New Egg

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    Jul 11, 2016
    Three Lakes Wisconsin
    I am a newbie chicken Mama. Slightly obsessed chicken mama. I purchased 6 chicks at a week old, straight run. Risky... I know. They are now about 11 weeks old, full of personality and beautiful. My 3 boys and I are totally in love with them, well mostly me. I am in love with them. But there is one chick, well, that just isn't quite like the others. She has been named Freckles, she is beautiful. The rest, I am firmly starting to believe, are Roosters!! Insert sobs here...
    They get along very well, they always stick together, lay down together, follow each other around, snuggle...like loving chicken siblings??
    My questions are:
    Will I have to get rid of 4 of the roosters? (I have read that multiple Roosters can live together just fine)
    Or should I get more hens for my Roos?
    If I kept only one Rooster...would they end up making babies, so I could have more layers, like I originally wanted?

    Killing them is the absolute last resort for me right now.

    Freckles on the right...
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Pyxis

    Pyxis Hatchaholic Extrordinaire Premium Member

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    Yep, looks like you have one pullet and lots of boys! You can keep them and they will do fine together, but you will need a lot of girls for them so they don't injure the girls by overmating them. The general recommendation is ten hens for every rooster. You may be able to get away with fewer if your boys are pretty gentle with them. Another option would be to house the boys separately from the girls and just put one with the girls when you want fertile eggs.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2016
  3. redsoxs

    redsoxs Chicken Obsessed

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    Greetings from Kansas and :welcome. Pleased you joined us. But sorry to hear about your rooster predicament. Straight run is always risky and I personally wonder just how random the selection process is when ordering straight run. I've ordered SR 3 times when I wanted a certain breed that was only available going that route. Over 75% of the birds have been roos. Guess what? I don't order SR anymore. I guess if I was breeding and hatching it would be different but I don't so, like you I'm left with the surplus rooster dilemma. If I were you, you might try posting in the WI thread in this link https://www.backyardchickens.com/f/26/where-am-i-where-are-you
    You can also try this thread https://www.backyardchickens.com/f/16182/animals-in-need-of-free-re-homing
    Or, https://www.backyardchickens.com/f/67/buy-sell-trade
    Best of luck to you! M
     
  4. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    Hi and welcome to BYC - you have some great advice and links already so I'll just say hello!

    All the best
    CT
     
  5. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    I see ONE pullet and one ? because it is facing backwards so can't see if it has much comb. You sure do have boys
     
  6. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop

    Welcome to BYC! It's great to have you.

    Yep, four boys and one girl. Those are bad odds, sorry!

    For four roosters, you'll need to have a LOT more hens, at least 25-30 (preferably 40-50). Overwise they will overmate them. Your other option is to build a bachelor pen to house the roosters separately from your hens. Cockerels raised together get along just fine, especially if the hens are out of sight so they have nothing to be territorial over.

    Keeping a rooster(s) with your hens does mean eggs will be fertile, but there's a bit more than that involved in actually "making babies". You'll also need to wait for a hen to go broody and let her incubate eggs for 21 days before they will hatch. You'll also need to separate hens from the flock during brooding and raising of chicks. Of course you can also go the artificial route and purchase an incubator and brood them yourself.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2016
  7. WyandotteWally

    WyandotteWally New Egg

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    Jul 11, 2016
    Three Lakes Wisconsin
    Wow! Thank you all for the input. It is a bit overwhelming and disappointing at the same time.My goal was six hens for eggs, and now that is all changed, lol! I have put so much time, money and effort into these chicks, their coop and learning everything I can...only to find out I have WAAAAAY more to learn, and a lot more work ahead of me if I DO keep the roos.
    My coop is a 6 x 8 shed, with six external nesting boxes, ha ha, an automatic chicken door, windows and skylight... it's almost better than our house, lol.
    Could I divide it in half with chicken wire, to separate the roos from the hens? Or do they need to be totally out of sight from each other?
    Thank you all again for your experienced advice! I appreciate it!
     
  8. WyandotteWally

    WyandotteWally New Egg

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    Jul 11, 2016
    Three Lakes Wisconsin
    [​IMG]
     
  9. BantamFan4Life

    BantamFan4Life LOOK WHAT YOU MADE ME DO. Premium Member

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    Washington
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    Looks like only one pullet there [​IMG]
     

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