My families urban flock...

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by FrozenWings, Nov 20, 2013.

  1. FrozenWings

    FrozenWings Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 20, 2013
    About 31 weeks ago we began purchasing our (6) hen flock. We purchased (3) hens within a 7 day period. Hens purchased were a Jersey Giant, Silver Wyandotte, and a Silver Back Leghorn. About 21 days later we purchase (3) more hens. They were a Buff Brahma, a Buff Orpington, and an Easter Egger.

    31 weeks later still no eggs? Are we doing something wrong?

    It is cold at night here, the days are short, but it has yet to get less than 25 degrees at night. The snow has been scarce, a very mild start to the winter for Colorado's front range.

    I have been reading and following this forum for quite some time. I try to follow well thought out suggestions there are plenty of them, but we built our coop with these suggestions. Our coop does not have heat other than the compost from the chickens. We have used plenty of ventilation, the coop is secure from all predators, and the is run protected with buried fence and chicken wire above. I suppose that if a coyote or bear really wanted to get in the chicken wire or pane of plexi glass isn't gong to keep it out.

    I feed my chickens some organic egg starter formula that they have access to in their coop. I have created some chicken crack they eat every day that has songbird bird seed, chicken scratch, dried meal worms, oatmeal, and some of their starter food. In addition they eat squash, egg shell, oyster shell, pumpkin, free range, and table scraps.

    We have (6) lay boxes that measure 14"x14"x18" inside the coop, and (4) areas enclosed outside in their run. If anyone has any advise, other than keep waiting, please let us know.

    [​IMG]

    Thanks
     
  2. 1muttsfan

    1muttsfan Overrun With Chickens

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    Hi and welcome to BYC from northern Michigan [​IMG]

    The most likely culprit for lack of eggs is the short day length. You can place a light in your coop to come on around 4 am, giving them a longer day.

    Your diet sounds like it is unbalanced with possibly high fat and protein. Chicken feed is balanced to provide all the nutrition a birds needs. Excess fats and proteins are converted to excess body fat. A balanced grower/finisher ration would be best, with other feeds composing only around 15% of the calorie intake - meaning less scratch, and more formulated diet. Young fat birds do not lay as well.
     
  3. Mr MKK FARMS

    Mr MKK FARMS Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC! Glad you joined us! [​IMG]
     
  4. liz9910

    liz9910 Overrun With Chickens

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    Welcome to BYC!
     
  5. petrel

    petrel Chats with Chickens

    Hello and Welcome!!
     
  6. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    [​IMG] chicken wire only keeps chickens IN, it doesn't keep predators OUT. Any pred worth his salt can slice thru chicken wire like it was butter. 1/2 inch hardware cloth, securely affixed to a fence, or posts, will give better protection. For Bears and big stuff, get some electric fencing.
     
  7. All Henned Up

    All Henned Up Muffs or Tufts

    Welcome and enjoy BYC!
    Steve :frow
     
  8. hosspak

    hosspak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lake Elsinore, CA.
    I love, love, love, LOVE the simplicity of your setup. I agree with Muttsfan, if you want to force production add some lighting or let nature run it's course. The feed that stores sell is formulated for best results (whether ORG or not), I tried to go the fancy "mix my own feed" but ended up wasting money and time. Unless they're all roosters they will start on their own when they are ready, some will start, some will wait....one might lay everyday, one might lay 1 a week. Most chickens will be slackers at times. Heck you could walk out there in the morning and find 1, 2, 0r 5 eggs. The run is simple but affective, most of us build to what we want or can afford, I'm betting that over the next few months you will redesign, rearrange, or reconstruct the run over, and over.
    Just don't forget to have fun and enjoy them.
     
  9. kidcody

    kidcody Overrun With Chickens

    [​IMG] from washington state glad you could join us! [​IMG]
     

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