My First Coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by allanb, Feb 20, 2016.

  1. allanb

    allanb Out Of The Brooder

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    I've read the popular rule of 4 square feet per chicken. Is that the rule for space in the run or for the coop itself? I just received my 8 chicks Thursday. I was thinking of building a 6x8 coop. A little bigger than I need but would allow for growth if we get some more chickens. Any thoughts on the size?
     
  2. Chicken Egg 17

    Chicken Egg 17 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think a 4x8 coop would be plenty big enough for eight chickens and still have room for more and the 4 sq feet per bird is four the run not the coop they need like 1-2 sq feet in the coop
     
  3. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    The 4 sq ft refers to space in the coop (not accounting for feeders / waterers, nests etc). This suggestion is made in order to provide a tolerable environment for your flock should the weather be unsuitable for them to be outdoors. Roost space is recommended to be 2 sq ft.

    I'd go for as bigger coop as you can - as you say chicken maths get to us all. A garden shed is my personal preference, but if you check out the coop section, you'll see more designs that you've had hot dinners!

    All the best
    CT
     
  4. Percheron chick

    Percheron chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    6x8 should be your minimum. It will allow for some growth of your flock and better air circulation. Follow the 4 square feet rule as a general guideline for coop space. Save floor space by building the nesting boxes outside.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2016
  5. bigt447

    bigt447 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have l0 layers and my 8x4x4 coop is plenty roomy for them and 3 layer boxes on each end. They only are there to lay and roost. Have 4 roost bars and they only use about 1/3 of the space on them. Plus, much less cutting to build with five 8x4 sheets of plywood.
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    The most often cited 'rule of thumb' is 4 sq ft per bird in coop, 10 sqft per bird in run.
    But that is a bare minimum IMO, especially if you live in a cold climate.

    I'd go 8x8 for material efficiency and ease of adding birds later(you need extra space when adding birds)....more space the better and easier things will be....
    ...and go 8 tall too, better ventilation mangement.
     
  7. allanb

    allanb Out Of The Brooder

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    With regards to ventillation. I know someone that used a metal roof on their coop. Instead of fastening the roofing to plywood he screwed the roofing directly to the rafters and uses the ridges in the metal roof to act as ventillation. Sounds interesting. Any thoughts on that?
     
  8. Percheron chick

    Percheron chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That will work fine. The potential problem is how hot the coop will get in the summer with no insulation in the roof.
     
  9. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Not much there really...depends on how the rafters are installed.
    If the rafters are installed on top of a top plate in wall the space between rafters gives good ventilation,
    then it doesn't matter whether the metal roofing is attached to plywood or directly to the rafters.
     
  10. Chicken Egg 17

    Chicken Egg 17 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A rock landed on one of my rafters and bent the tin all up and cracked the rafter
     

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