My first questions, combs, broodiness, etc.

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by GUSRENTIT, Nov 29, 2011.

  1. GUSRENTIT

    GUSRENTIT Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 29, 2011
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    I'm so new, I don't have a clue, please help. I'm trying to figure out what all these terms mean in my world. I'm looking to raise dual purpose chickens, and while looking at the "breed" section, I see that they have descriptions. Most are self explanatory, but I was wondering what they mean by "broodiness", and why would the type of comb make a differance?
    Thanks,
    Gus
     
  2. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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  3. GUSRENTIT

    GUSRENTIT Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks Kevin, I guess, I should have asked the question better. If I'm NOT going for show, just meat and eggs, how does the type of comb affect my selection? As far as "broodiness" goes, does that mean that they are good or bad at ? And how should it influence my selection?
    Thanks,
    Gus
     
  4. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Combs are really more for show. Some of the more exotic combs are just more susceptible to frost bite. Broodiness just describes either way. A lot of really good layer breeds may not go broody often. In this case if you wanted to hatch more of them you would need another broody hen or a incubator.
     
  5. Marcymom3

    Marcymom3 Chillin' With My Peeps

    [​IMG] and [​IMG] from Maryland! You're in the right place!

    If you are raising your chickens for meat and eggs, the combs probably won't make much difference. Broodiness describes the behavior of a pullet/hen when she want to sit on eggs to hatch them. If you are planning to have a rooster so your hens can produce chicks, broodiness is a desirable characteristic. If you only plan to have a flock for eggs, then broodiness is not something that you need to worry about.

    Storey's Guide to Raising Chickens is a great resource and you can get it from Amazon for about $12. Others have also recommended Chickens for Dummies. This website is full of great information, and if you have specific questions you can use the search feature to find out all that and then some. [​IMG] Also, if you go under Index you will find the FAC's. There's a great list of all the things you may have questions about, including the dictionary. I bet I've looked at it ten million times.

    Good luck and enjoy your chicken adventure!
    Marcy
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2011
  6. GUSRENTIT

    GUSRENTIT Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 29, 2011
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    Thanks guys, that was what I was looking for. Just so much to learn, and some of the simple things are the hardest to learn.
    Thanks,
    Gus
     
  7. kfacres

    kfacres Chillin' With My Peeps

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    broodiness is a good trait to have, in a backyard flock. I personally keep a few silkies around, just for that trait of hatching eggs for me. Usually though, it seems when I have something broody. I don't have any eggs. If your at all wanting to expand your flock, or make is sustainable, and you have either average incubators or incubator skills... then a broody chicken is the way to go. Sometimes though, I find myself wondering what is more sustainable and ecconmical, feeding a broody to be hen all year, or running electricity in the 'bator for 21 days at a time....

    Combs can be very important, somewhat for the backyard flock as well. In colder enviroments, very large single combs, and average sized singles can get frost bit. Another thing to worry about is the fluff on silkies, or Polish-- that tends to be high maintance in terms of keeping it dry and clean, or trimmed. Just as important to me, is the feathering of the legs... In a chicken producing system where the birds will be let free range, or couped on the ground-- i discourage feather legs-- just due to keeping them clean and tidy looking. Maybe it's just a personal objective, but I feel that feather legged birds are not as good of free rangers due to this.
     
  8. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:This is what I was about to say as well [​IMG]
     
  9. Marcymom3

    Marcymom3 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:This is why we all hang out here, Gus! LOL... we're all learning something new everyday! It's great, isn't it?

    Marcy
     
  10. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

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    Central Oregon
    When you are buying birds, the comb shape can help you determine if you are getting purebreds or not. If you are paying for purebreds, you want to get purebreds. If you don't care if they are purebreds, pay less money and buy birds of unknown parentage or lower quality.

    The shape of the comb can tell you whether the young bird is a pullet or a rooster.

    The color of the comb on a hen will tell your whether she is laying or not.

    Large combs are more prone to frost bite.

    Sometimes, the shape of the comb has visual appeal. There is nothing wrong with enjoying looking at your chickens.

    Broody hens are not laying eggs. It's up to you whether you want to hatch chicks or not, If you don't want your hens hatching chicks then get breeds that aren't broody. Those breeds don't take time off from laying eggs to raise a family.
     

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