My fish died...

gurooh

Songster
11 Years
Apr 9, 2008
214
1
131
New York
Today I had a friend over, and I went to show her my goldfish. When we got up to my room, my fish was dead. I took the tank down to my mom and showed her the fish. I didn't know how it had died. R.I.P. Bubbles the goldfish...I will always love you.
 

gurooh

Songster
11 Years
Apr 9, 2008
214
1
131
New York
Thank you guys! I have another fish...he's got a 1 gallon tank and is a Betta fish. His name is Hector and he's got 1 white streak on his fin. Bubbles was pink!
 

Stacykins

Crowing
9 Years
Jan 19, 2011
4,355
223
258
Escanaba, MI
Quote:Just so you know, bettas are tropical fish and need warmer than room temperature water. They make 7.5 watt aquarium heaters and what would work for your 1 gallon. In addition, since a 1 gallon cannot be cycled easily, you will need to do a 100% water change once a week to prevent ammonia levels from getting to high. High ammonia results in burned fins, gills, general stress, and death. And a betta kept in unheated water is listless, less colorful, stressed, and won't thrive.

Hate to say it, if you were keeping your goldfish in a 1 gallon, there is little wonder he died. I am not trying to be insensitive, but goldfish, even fancy ones, need huge aquariums with large amounts of filtration and water circulation to be kept healthy. They produce a lot of waste. Goldfish seem 'healthy' for so long in tiny bowls just because they are incredibly resilient fish. The stocking level for fancy goldfish is 20 gallons for the first fish, and 10 gallons for the second (and since they are social fish, they need to be kept in a pair at least for optimal health). Comet or 'common' goldfish need even MORE space, and really should only be kept in large ponds since they can grow over a foot long.
 

Evelle

Songster
8 Years
Apr 27, 2011
2,219
17
163
North Idaho
i like what stacykins has told you. not insensitive..... informitive.. goldfish tho cheep are almost as hard to keep as tropical fish. they produce very high amounts of ammonia. and also they dont have stomics so you have to feed them often (little amounts) also 1 gallon tank is way to small to be keeping ANYthing in. they are fish and need room to swim. 10 gallons is even a small tank. im sorry about your fish. i had a bad case of ick some how and lost half my tank
any pet no matter how small it sad when they leave us. i hope stacykins and i gave you enough information to help get you started on the right track.
 
Last edited:

roocrazy

Songster
10 Years
Jun 11, 2009
2,137
9
181
minnesota!!!!
Quote:Just so you know, bettas are tropical fish and need warmer than room temperature water. They make 7.5 watt aquarium heaters and what would work for your 1 gallon. In addition, since a 1 gallon cannot be cycled easily, you will need to do a 100% water change once a week to prevent ammonia levels from getting to high. High ammonia results in burned fins, gills, general stress, and death. And a betta kept in unheated water is listless, less colorful, stressed, and won't thrive.

Hate to say it, if you were keeping your goldfish in a 1 gallon, there is little wonder he died. I am not trying to be insensitive, but goldfish, even fancy ones, need huge aquariums with large amounts of filtration and water circulation to be kept healthy. They produce a lot of waste. Goldfish seem 'healthy' for so long in tiny bowls just because they are incredibly resilient fish. The stocking level for fancy goldfish is 20 gallons for the first fish, and 10 gallons for the second (and since they are social fish, they need to be kept in a pair at least for optimal health). Comet or 'common' goldfish need even MORE space, and really should only be kept in large ponds since they can grow over a foot long.

my betta lived in room temp water for 4 years.
 

Stacykins

Crowing
9 Years
Jan 19, 2011
4,355
223
258
Escanaba, MI
Quote:Just so you know, bettas are tropical fish and need warmer than room temperature water. They make 7.5 watt aquarium heaters and what would work for your 1 gallon. In addition, since a 1 gallon cannot be cycled easily, you will need to do a 100% water change once a week to prevent ammonia levels from getting to high. High ammonia results in burned fins, gills, general stress, and death. And a betta kept in unheated water is listless, less colorful, stressed, and won't thrive.

Hate to say it, if you were keeping your goldfish in a 1 gallon, there is little wonder he died. I am not trying to be insensitive, but goldfish, even fancy ones, need huge aquariums with large amounts of filtration and water circulation to be kept healthy. They produce a lot of waste. Goldfish seem 'healthy' for so long in tiny bowls just because they are incredibly resilient fish. The stocking level for fancy goldfish is 20 gallons for the first fish, and 10 gallons for the second (and since they are social fish, they need to be kept in a pair at least for optimal health). Comet or 'common' goldfish need even MORE space, and really should only be kept in large ponds since they can grow over a foot long.

my betta lived in room temp water for 4 years.


Congrats, but that doesn't change the fact that they are still tropical fish and room temperature is too cold for them to be healthy. Thailand is not a temperate location
 

City Chicken Lady

Songster
8 Years
Jul 11, 2011
174
8
116
Mongomery AL
Quote:Just so you know, bettas are tropical fish and need warmer than room temperature water. They make 7.5 watt aquarium heaters and what would work for your 1 gallon. In addition, since a 1 gallon cannot be cycled easily, you will need to do a 100% water change once a week to prevent ammonia levels from getting to high. High ammonia results in burned fins, gills, general stress, and death. And a betta kept in unheated water is listless, less colorful, stressed, and won't thrive.

Hate to say it, if you were keeping your goldfish in a 1 gallon, there is little wonder he died. I am not trying to be insensitive, but goldfish, even fancy ones, need huge aquariums with large amounts of filtration and water circulation to be kept healthy. They produce a lot of waste. Goldfish seem 'healthy' for so long in tiny bowls just because they are incredibly resilient fish. The stocking level for fancy goldfish is 20 gallons for the first fish, and 10 gallons for the second (and since they are social fish, they need to be kept in a pair at least for optimal health). Comet or 'common' goldfish need even MORE space, and really should only be kept in large ponds since they can grow over a foot long.

my betta lived in room temp water for 4 years.


I have three bettas in separate aquariums and they have room temp year round, which means 68 winter, 76 summer. They have been on my mantel for several years now. Sorry about Bubbles.
 

ReikiStar

Songster
8 Years
May 3, 2011
880
22
123
Cascade foothills of WA
Quote:Just so you know, bettas are tropical fish and need warmer than room temperature water. They make 7.5 watt aquarium heaters and what would work for your 1 gallon. In addition, since a 1 gallon cannot be cycled easily, you will need to do a 100% water change once a week to prevent ammonia levels from getting to high. High ammonia results in burned fins, gills, general stress, and death. And a betta kept in unheated water is listless, less colorful, stressed, and won't thrive.

Hate to say it, if you were keeping your goldfish in a 1 gallon, there is little wonder he died. I am not trying to be insensitive, but goldfish, even fancy ones, need huge aquariums with large amounts of filtration and water circulation to be kept healthy. They produce a lot of waste. Goldfish seem 'healthy' for so long in tiny bowls just because they are incredibly resilient fish. The stocking level for fancy goldfish is 20 gallons for the first fish, and 10 gallons for the second (and since they are social fish, they need to be kept in a pair at least for optimal health). Comet or 'common' goldfish need even MORE space, and really should only be kept in large ponds since they can grow over a foot long.

Thank you, Stacykins for what you said about the Bettas and Goldfish. We've always had our Bettas in heated and filtered tanks. They too lived for years. We've even had one or two in community tanks where no one picked on them and they enjoyed the socializing. Just because something CAN live a certain way, doesn't necessarily mean it's happy or it's the best conditions.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom