My hens arent laying

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by huntergirl25, Dec 9, 2013.

  1. huntergirl25

    huntergirl25 Out Of The Brooder

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    hi I just got my first flock not to long ago and they completely stopped laying eggs. It is winter where I am and im not sure if it is from the cold or the time change? any ideas?
     
  2. blueseal

    blueseal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    my hens have slacked off as well mine all started laying in july I was getting 16 -17 eggs a day from 20. since the shorter days im getting 7-11 eggs a day. my white leghorns lay everyday but im only getting 3-4 eggs a day from my 10 brown egglayers.
     
  3. huntergirl25

    huntergirl25 Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 9, 2013
    Michigan
    mine started laying about 3 mo ago I put in a light to turn on at 4 am to increase laying hours and it has not helped im switching there feed maybe that will help
     
  4. theoldchick

    theoldchick The Chicken Whisperer

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    Shorter daylight does decrease egg production. What breed and what age are your hens? Some breeds stop completely in the winter. And as hens age they decrease egg production. It's always a good idea to vary the diets of your birds no matter what age and what time of the year it is.
     
  5. huntergirl25

    huntergirl25 Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 9, 2013
    Michigan
    I have Rhode Island Reds they are hearty and supposed to be good layers I am told three are molting and only 1 is laying out of the six they are only about 8 mo old.
     
  6. shmeggs

    shmeggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I also have rhode island reds I have 6 grown hens im getting average 4 eggs per day during middle of winter. I have found the quality of food affects the way mine lay also.
     
  7. huntergirl25

    huntergirl25 Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 9, 2013
    Michigan
    i just recently changed there food about 3-5 days ago from Dumor layer pellets (from tractor supply co) to another brand I have not learned the name of yet also does it make a difference if they eat crumbles or pellets?
     
  8. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Chickens generally don’t like change. About any change can stress them and cause them to reduce or stop laying for a while. If change is stressful enough it can even lead them into a molt. One of the best things you can do is try to be consistent. Moving them to a new location can stress them. Adding to or talking away flock members can stress them because it messes with the pecking order. Some chickens reduce or stop laying in extreme heat or cold.

    Adding light can help get them to start laying, but it does not turn on the laying overnight. How long it takes depends on what shape the hens are in inside. If they are molting they need to finish the molt. If they have shut down, they need to grow the ova large enough to be used as yolks and they have to get their internal plumbing into egg laying mode. Sometimes that can take a few weeks if they are totally shut down. Be consistent with that lighting. Changes there can really mess them up.

    The only difference in pellets and crumbles is the shape. Whether it is mash, crumbles, or pellets means nothing as far as nutrition goes. You need to read the analysis on the label to see the nutrition. The way they make the chicken feed is to grind up all the ingredients that want for that analysis into a pretty fine powder and mix that well. That powder is called mash. If they want pellets, that take that mash, wet it with water and extrude it through a dye while drying it. If they want crumble, they crush those pellets a little bit. The reason for the different forms is that different automatic feeding systems work better with different forms of the feed. Also, if it is left as mash, the nutrients can separate due to gravity. If they are in crumble or pellet form those nutrients stay mixed. I don’t know what the differences are those two different brands. You’ll need to look at the label to see that, but whether it is crumbles or pellets has nothing to do with that.

    With three molting you can’t expect any eggs out of them until the molt is over. So you are getting one egg a day from the other three. I don’t know why you are not getting more. There really could be a whole lot of reasons, even things I have not mentioned. The best thing you can do is be consistent with the light, food, and their living conditions and be patient. Many of us go through things like this in the winter. Sometimes in the middle of summer too due to the heat if we live where it gets really hot.

    Good luck!
     

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